Aramaic: Orasabbarachiasabbaramaia

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Mari5

New Member
Italian
Hello. I need help to translate a phrase from Aramaic into English or French or Italian.
I only know how it sounds. I can't write it.

The phrase is:

Orasabbarachiasabbaramaia

And then:

Scirabassana

I thank everybody who wants to help me.

Mari
 
  • Mari5

    New Member
    Italian
    Hello Amikama, thanks for your answer.
    I think that "maya" should stay for "heaven" and "bara" for earth. It's a religious text. I'm not sure it's aramaic...but it should. I' ve already said I can't write it, but I can pronunciate.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Hello Mari5,

    You must provide sufficient context to get helpful answers. Where did you find this? A book? What is the title of the book? Online? What is the URL of the page you found it?... whatever information you can provide about this would help us help you.
    And please take a moment to read the forum rules.

    Thanks,
    Cherine
    Moderator
     

    rayloom

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Hijazi Arabic)
    Hello Amikama, thanks for your answer.
    I think that "maya" should stay for "heaven" and "bara" for earth. It's a religious text. I'm not sure it's aramaic...but it should. I' ve already said I can't write it, but I can pronunciate.
    shmaya is heaven
    b-'ar'a is "in earth"
    Are you sure it's not just the Lord's prayer, the part in Matthew 6:10 "Your kingdom come, thy will be done, in earth as it is in heaven."
    In Aramaic that part would be:
    tīṯe malkūṯāḵ nehwe ṣeḇyānāḵ ᵓaykannā dəḇašmayyā ᵓāp barᶜā
     

    Mari5

    New Member
    Italian
    Thanks for you precious help. I Think it's a prayer or a praise. I don't think it's the part you quoted because the sound looks different. How do you read it?
     

    rayloom

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Hijazi Arabic)
    You can find several recitations on youtube. In general if you search "Abun d'bashmayo" or "the Lord's prayer in Aramaic" you'd get plenty of results.
    Search for this one:
    The Lord's Prayer in Aramaic (Abun d'beschmayo)

    Notice that the final definite article has shifted from a long final -a to -o in Neo-Aramaic dialects, as such "heaven" would be pronounced shmayo instead of shmaya.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    This does not look the slightest bit like the Lord’s Prayer in Aramaic. The only thing that looks Aramaic is “baramaia” (“in Aramaic”), and this is not part of the Pater Noster. Otherwise, I cannot see any Aramaic words here. But perhaps someone else will have more success.
     

    Mari5

    New Member
    Italian
    Slowly everything is taking a shape. I know that Aramaic is still spoken somewhere
    This does not look the slightest bit like the Lord’s Prayer in Aramaic. The only thing that looks Aramaic is “baramaia” (“in Aramaic”), and this is not part of the Pater Noster. Otherwise, I cannot see any Aramaic words here. But perhaps someone else will have more success.
    It can be s.th. different and not a prayer, I hope to find s.o. who knows the meaning.
    Thanks for your help
    shmaya is heaven
    b-'ar'a is "in earth"
    Are you sure it's not just the Lord's prayer, the part in Matthew 6:10 "Your kingdom come, thy will be done, in earth as it is in heaven."
    In Aramaic that part would be:
    tīṯe malkūṯāḵ nehwe ṣeḇyānāḵ ᵓaykannā dəḇašmayyā ᵓāp barᶜā
    Do you know how to say the words "devil", "glory", "holy", "curse"? Could you please write the pronunciation?
     
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    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Do you know how to say the words "devil", "glory", "holy", "curse"? Could you please write the pronunciation?
    devil: sāṭān(ā)
    glory: hḏar/heḏrā/haḏrā or šḇīḥ(t)ā or šḇīḥū(ṯā) or tašbāḥ(ā) or šuḇhār(ā) (possibly other words as well)
    holy: qaddīš- (with the appropriate adjectival ending)
    holiness: qḏoš/quḏšā
    curse: lwāṭ(ā) or lawṭ(ṯ)ā or bḡan/baḡnā
    to curse: l-w-ṭ (this is the root, the conjugation is complicated)
    to bless: b-r-k (this is the root, the conjugation is complicated)

    Also, while šmayyā is heaven, mayyā is water.
     
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    Mari5

    New Member
    Italian
    šuḇhār(ā)
    An old pronunciation could be schabara (as an Italian I would write "sciabara")?
    devil: sāṭān(ā)
    glory: hḏar/heḏrā/haḏrā or šḇīḥ(t)ā or šḇīḥū(ṯā) or tašbāḥ(ā) or šuḇhār(ā) (possibly other words as well)
    holy: qaddīš- (with the appropriate adjectival ending)
    holiness: qḏoš/quḏšā
    curse: lwāṭ(ā) or lawṭ(ṯ)ā or bḡan/baḡnā
    to curse: l-w-ṭ (this is the root, the conjugation is complicated)
    to bless: b-r-k (this is the root, the conjugation is complicated)

    Also, while šmayyā is heaven, mayyā is water.
    I like this language more and more

    "Chia" stays for "kia"
     
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    rayloom

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Hijazi Arabic)
    Like Cherine said, more context would be helpful. Where did you hear it or learn it? And from whom?

    Was there a special occasion like a certain holiday, Christmas, Easter etc?

    If you have certain meanings, can you tell us what the prayer/praise means, even in a generalistic way.
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    An old pronunciation could be schabara (as an Italian I would write "sciabara")?
    No, I think in modern dialects, it would have become something like šūhārā (because of a /β ~ v/ > /w/ change, and /uw/ = /u:/), if this word is still used, but šuḇhār(ā) is the classical form. It is possible that if a phrase were preserved by Italian speakers, it could have become "s(ci)ab(b)ara" over time.

    Note that:
    ḇ = /β ~ v/
    ḡ = /ɣ ~ ʁ/
    ḏ = /ð/
    ḵ = /x ~ χ/
    p̄ = /ɸ ~ f/ (but shifted back to /p/ in most cases even in Classical Syriac)
    ṯ = /θ/
     

    Mari5

    New Member
    Italian
    Like Cherine said, more context would be helpful. Where did you hear it or learn it? And from whom?

    Was there a special occasion like a certain holiday, Christmas, Easter etc?

    If you have certain meanings, can you tell us what the prayer/praise means, even in a generalistic way.
    Unfortunately not. I heard it in a Church. A man continued to repeat it many times but nobody knew the meaning.
    No, I think in modern dialects, it would have become something like šūhārā (because of a /β ~ v/ > /w/ change, and /uw/ = /u:/), if this word is still used, but šuḇhār(ā) is the classical form. It is possible that if a phrase were preserved by Italian speakers, it could have become "s(ci)ab(b)ara" over time.

    Note that:
    ḇ = /β ~ v/
    ḡ = /ɣ ~ ʁ/
    ḏ = /ð/
    ḵ = /x ~ χ/
    p̄ = /ɸ ~ f/ (but shifted back to /p/ in most cases even in Classical Syriac)
    ṯ = /θ/
    Thanks for these detailed and important information
     
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