are failing vs. are failed !!

AlexFergie

Senior Member
Persian
I'm so confused about what to choose between option A and option C. both seem to be correct , but I guess option C is the most suitable alternative. Is it correct? Does the entire sentence follow the structure of passive ? or Low incomes as subject wants to say sth in an active voice !!!!!!!!

Low incomes ………………. along with high increase in prices.
a. are failing to get
b. are failing getting
c. are failed to get
d. has failed getting
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Low incomes ………………. along with high increase in prices.
    a. are failing to get
    b. are failing getting
    c. are failed to get
    d. has failed getting
    To me, none of them are idiomatic/correct.

    1. The idea of low incomes "getting along" [with something] is wrong.
    2. "with high increase in prices" is wrong - increases are not "high" they are steep, large, great, disturbing, etc... but not "high".
    3. "with high increase in prices" - "increase in prices" needs an article.

    Low incomes have failed to keep pace with the steep increase in prices.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with Paul.
    Option a. works grammatically*, but none of the options make sense:(

    * assuming high increase in prices is an error for high increases in prices / the high increase in prices.
     

    AlexFergie

    Senior Member
    Persian
    To me, none of them are idiomatic/correct.

    1. The idea of low incomes "getting along" [with something] is wrong.
    2. "with high increase in prices" is wrong - increases are not "high" they are steep, large, great, disturbing, etc... but not "high".
    3. "with high increase in prices" - "increase in prices" needs an article.

    Low incomes have failed to keep pace with the steep increase in prices.
    thanks a lot for your great explanation:thank you::thank you:
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    SSBE (Standard Southern British English)
    The sentences you are quoting from this booklet all seem to be incorrect in some way. Even the technically correct ones sound odd and unidiomatic. Do you really have to use this booklet? You cannot learn a language from such poor examples of English.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It's worth noting that "to get along with [noun phrase]" = to tolerate [noun phrase] well; to have a casual bond with [noun phrase]:

    A: "I detest John! He never listens to anything I say. What do you think of him?"
    B: "Oh! I'm surprised - I get along with him. I think he's amusing."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Please explain, Paul, how the three verbs (?) become 'noun phrases'.
    It's worth noting that "to get along with [noun phrase]" = to tolerate [noun phrase] well; to have a casual bond with [noun phrase]:
    This may be clearer as

    "It's worth noting that "to get along with <insert noun phrase>" = to tolerate <insert noun phrase> well; to have a casual bond with <insert noun phrase>."
     
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