"Are they bogies or bandits?"

Arrius

Senior Member
English, UK
I just saw a war film set in the 90's (the near future at the time) in which the navigator of an American nuclear bomber sees a group of bright dots approaching on his radar screen and wonders "Are they bogies or bandits?" Soon thereafter there are a number of bangs and flashes, but it was not made clear what either of these possible menaces was. (Incidentally, the bomber survives).
In WW II, bandits was RAF slang for hostile aeroplanes ("Bandits at twelve o'clock!" - their position, not the time), and bogies was not used, so if the same term is still used for hostile aircraft,then bogies are presumably rockets or heat-seeking missiles. Am I right?
 
  • Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Since bogey(man) is some kind of a ghost (besides being a piece of solidified snot in schoolboy parlance) that would explain the "unidentified".
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Booger in England is only the phonetic representation of the Midland and Northern pronunciation of bugger.
     
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