Are they comfortable to wear?

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
I just love your new shoes. Are they comfortable to wear?
I just love your new shoes. Is it comfortable to wear them?
I just love your new shoes. Do you feel comfortable to wear them?


Do all of the above read well to you? If not, how would you to correct them to make them sound right? Thanks.
 
  • tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    My dear Dandelion, you know that grammar is not my forte, I just know what sounds right and what doesn't. I would not use comfortable to wear them. I would say are they comfortable to wear? Something about the infinitive does not sound right to me, but I cannot explain why.
    Someone else please bail me out!
     

    LikeBarleyBending

    Senior Member
    China, Chinese
    My dear Dandelion, you know that grammar is not my forte, I just know what sounds right and what doesn't. I would not use comfortable to wear them. I would say are they comfortable to wear? Something about the infinitive does not sound right to me, but I cannot explain why.
    Someone else please bail me out!

    Let me have a try:

    You can feel comfortable or not only when you are wearing them. To me, "you are comfortable to wear them" means you are willing or have no difficulty to wear them.

    Just a try.~~
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    My dear Dandelion, you know that grammar is not my forte, I just know what sounds right and what doesn't. I would not use comfortable to wear them. I would say are they comfortable to wear? Something about the infinitive does not sound right to me, but I cannot explain why.
    Someone else please bail me out!
    I guess when you say "Do you feel comfortable wearing them?", it means "do you feel comfortable when you are wearing them", while "Do you feel comfortable to wear them?" means "do you feel comfortable to do such a thing", in this case, to wear the shoes.

    Perhaps those shoes are not yours, or maybe someone has some strange feet disease just wore them.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The first sentence is clearly asking if the shoes are comfortable.
    The third sentence is clearly asking if the wearer feels comfortable.
    The second sentence is an unidiomatic structure that could be interpreted as either.

    Are your shoes comfortable?
    ... is a simple question about how well the shoes fit and what they feel like on your feet.

    Are you comfortable wearing those shoes?
    ... is a more complex question. The answer could be no even if the shoes are very comfortable.
    This could be because although they are comfortable they are not suitable for the conditions - for example they are open sandals and it is snowing.
    It could be because they are inappropriate for the occasion - for example they are bright pink with high heels and I am on my way to a funeral wearing a black suit, a frock coat and a top hat.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, my kind friends.
    After reading your replies, it crossed my mind that the following may sound right.

    You'll feel comfortable to wear them.
    I'm sure that you feel comfortable to wear them.
    I doubt if I'll feel comfortable to wear them.


    If my gut feeling is right, then the reason that the third version in question doesn't sound right is very obvious.
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Thanks, my kind friends.
    After reading your replies, it crossed my mind that the following may sound right.

    You'll feel comfortable to wear them.
    I'm sure that you feel comfortable to wear them.
    I doubt if I'll feel comfortable to wear them.


    If my gut feeling is right, then the reason that the third version in question doesn't sound right is very obvious.
    Sorry, quietdandelion, but the sentences don't sound right to me! We don't usually say we are "comfortable to" do anything (although Nichec makes a good point), although we do say "I'm happy to see you".

    If you just want to know if the shoes fit well, you could say: "Are your shoes comfortable?" or "Do you find those shoes ['the ones you are wearing' is understood] comfortable?"

    If you wonder if the shoes are the right ones to have chosen for a particular occasion (not tennis shoes at a wedding, for instance) you could say: "Do you feel comfortable wearing those shoes?" This would, in the context and taking intonation into account, be a way of questioning the rightness of the choice of shoes (which would no doubt be resented by the person concerned!).
     
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