Are you a Christian?

~Lilla~

Senior Member
English - Australia
I am looking for a translation of the following two sentences (into Italian) with formal forms please:

"Are you a Christian?"
"Are you interested in Christianity?"

Thanks.
 
  • ~Lilla~

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Forse si dice 'Sei Cristiano?' o 'Sei un Cristiano?', senza o con l'articolo? (In Inglese penso è facoltativo...)
     

    arthurlee

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    I am looking for a translation of the following two sentences (into Italian) with formal forms please:

    "Are you a Christian?"
    "Are you interested in Christianity?"

    Thanks.
    Since you asked for the formal form, I'd say:
    - "(Lei) è...?"/"(Voi) siete...?";
    - "E' interessato a...", "Le interessa...?"/"Siete interessati a...?"/"Vi interessa...?"
    :)
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I've always heard it without the article in Italian (sei cristiano?), but I'm not a native. In English I'd use the article.

    Lilla, be careful with the word "cristiano"; although it's not correct, many Italians assume you're talking exclusively about catholicism. Check that they've understood your question!
     

    ElFrikiChino

    Senior Member
    Italian (Mantova)
    I've always heard it without the article in Italian (sei cristiano?):tick:, but I'm not a native. In English I'd use the article.

    Lilla, be careful with the word "cristiano"; although it's not correct, many Italians assume you're talking exclusively about catholicism. Check that they've understood your question!
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

    ~Lilla~

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Thanks everyone - very helpful posts! Sounds like I should omit the article. :)

    Einstein: Yes, I prefer it with the article in English too, but I've heard both. And yes, good point re: Catholicism! I suspected that might be the case. Thanks for confirming it for me. :)

    Arthur/anyone - Which form do you think is more appropriate for a sign on the street?
     

    altri libertini

    Member
    italian
    For a sign on the street I'd put:

    Sei Cristiano? (o Cattolico???)
    Ti interessa il Cristianesimo?

    E' davvero una piccolezza, ma potrebbe anche andar bene:
    "Sei cristiano?
    Sei interessato al Cristianesimo?"

    E' l'espressione che noto più usata -anche nei volantini e nelle pubblicazioni- da evangelici e testimoni di Geova quando mi fermano per strada o sul treno
     

    ~Lilla~

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    E' davvero una piccolezza, ma potrebbe anche andar bene:
    "Sei cristiano?
    Sei interessato al Cristianesimo?"

    E' l'espressione che noto più usata -anche nei volantini e nelle pubblicazioni- da evangelici e testimoni di Geova quando mi fermano per strada o sul treno

    Thanks, that sounds good to me. I'd prefer to use "Sei interessato al Cristianesimo?" if possible because the sentence will be translated in a few different languages, so if the literal translation was able to be similar for each of them that would (ideally) be better.

    "Ti interessa il Cristianesimo?" sounds like it's reflexive to me...? I'm a bit confused about that. Does it literally mean "Do you interest yourself in Christianity?"
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    The verb "interessare" is constructed the same way as "piacere".

    The subject is the 'thing' you are interested in, and you are the object.

    "Ti" is accusative, not dative.

    " Does Christianity interest you ? " , literally.
     

    Blackman

    Member Emeritus
    Italiano/Sardo
    I am looking for a translation of the following two sentences (into Italian) with formal forms please:

    "Are you a Christian?"
    "Are you interested in Christianity?"

    Thanks.


    Cristianità e Cristianesimo are sligthly different in italian. First refers to the area on earth, interested by this religion. Second is the religious movement.
     

    ~Lilla~

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    The verb "interessare" is constructed the same way as "piacere".

    The subject is the 'thing' you are interested in, and you are the object.

    "Ti" is accusative, not dative.

    " Does Christianity interest you ? " , literally.

    Ah, that completely makes sense! Thank you! I'm so glad I asked!
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    I like Christendom, never heard it.


    It is the old Germanic word, which originally meant "cristianesimo" as well , as does "Christentum" in modern German, and was replaced by the Neolatin "Christianity" for that meaning, retaining the meaning of "cristianita' " ( insieme dei popoli a maggioranza cristiana )
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    The word "Christendom" is a bit out of date also because the way of seeing religion has changed; in older times it was assumed that in every "Christian" country everyone, without exception, was a Christian and that outside this part of the world everything was pagan and uncivilised. Now things are seen differently. I don't know if that's true also for "cristianità" in Italian.
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    The word "Christendom" is a bit out of date also because the way of seeing religion has changed; in older times it was assumed that in every "Christian" country everyone, without exception, was a Christian and that outside this part of the world everything was pagan and uncivilised. Now things are seen differently. I don't know if that's true also for "cristianità" in Italian.


    Cristianita' is also a bit out of date. But, if you use it, it still means "christendom", not "christianity".
     
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