Are you hibernating?

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

Someone in my group hasn't talked for a long time, the other day when I mentioned her @, she said something.

I then said:

Are you hibernating?

I want to ask whether she's like a bear sleeping (not talking) in my room. (She is someone who can take on a joke. My good friend.)
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Had she not said anything, I would've said, "Are you hibernating".
    Because she spoke, I would've said, "Have you been hibernating".
    ..."nice to see you out of your den [cave]."
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Had she not said anything, I would've said, "Are you hibernating".
    Because she spoke, I would've said, "Have you been hibernating".
    ..."nice to see you out of your den [cave]."
    Thanks a lot, Blue.

    Do you mean that if this person didn't say anything since the day she joined the group, it's better to use "Are you...." and if she speaks from time to time but basically she doesn't talk, and once she speaks, it's been a long time since she did last time, I'd better say "Have you been....."?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I don't think I differentiate are you/have you been the same way Blueglaze does. The difference between the two - and this is a joke, so there's no point in over-analyzing - is that are you implies that the speaker believes she still is hibernating and have you been indicates that the speaker thinks it's possible that she might not be hibernating any longer. In other words, are you and have you been have their usual meanings here. There's nothing special about how they're being used in this sentence.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I don't think I differentiate are you/have you been the same way Blueglaze does. The difference between the two - and this is a joke, so there's no point in over-analyzing - is that are you implies that the speaker believes she still is hibernating and have you been indicates that the speaker thinks it's possible that she might not be hibernating any longer. In other words, are you and have you been have their usual meanings here. There's nothing special about how they're being used in this sentence.
    Thanks a lot, JK.

    Do you mean that in this case (joke), both are okay?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Yes, absolutely. Actually, in many cases both are OK because the difference in meaning is pretty slight. I would probably say "Have you been hibernating?" but the "are you" version is fine as well.
     
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