Are you hoping for a miracle?

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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The present progressive (continuous) asks if we are currently hoping for a miracle. You could also use the present interrogative: Do you hope for a miracle? It is probably more common to use the present progressive in such questions.
     

    Biddlesby

    Senior Member
    English (Brit.)
    Present progressive; as opposed to which tense? If you want to know what it adds, you will have to post what it was before.
     

    Neuromance

    New Member
    Russian
    Ceremoniar, the sentence is in the thread heading. It's "Are you hoping for a miracle? "

    Owlman5, I know that usually we don't use "hope" in continuous, as well as "believe", "think", "love" and others. But if we do use them it gives a sententence something specific. Annoying for example (You're always believing all the bullshit he says!")

    So why use continuous here?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Well, Neuromance, I would say that the question has been asked this way in order to emphasize the continuous presence of hope in somebody's life. This is really common:
    My wife has cancer. We're hoping for a miracle, but we don't expect her to live. That is, we continue to hope though we think that she will die.
     
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