Are you Japanese?

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
I found the following sentence somewhere online. It sounds a bit rude written by a non-native Japanese:

"阿呆か?お前は日本人じゃないか?"

Google Translate translates it interestingly as "Are you Japanese? Are you Japanese?" Eh?

It is weird because when "阿呆か?" is alone it would be translated as "Are you crazy?"

So my question is: Why GT would translate "阿呆か?お前は日本人じゃないか?" as "Are you Japanese? Are you Japanese?" but not "Are you crazy? Are you Japanese?" It seems that something special in Japanese makes GT crazy. Or the writer's awkward Japanese makes GT crazy...I don't know.

Thanks in advance
 
  • karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Yeah, I know sometimes the Google Translate or, I think, any other machine translator gives us funny translations, and I have no idea..

    I don't see what's causing it to translate it like that.

    It gave me now "Are you foolish? You are Japanese, are not you?"
    Someone might have been corrected it for you. :)
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Google question aside.

    I wonder the native Japanese way of saying something like "阿呆か?お前は日本人じゃないか?"
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Oh, if it's meant to be offensive or a strong affirmation, then '!' instead of '?'.

    '?' might be an effort to make the hursh word milder. I don't know the speaker's intention, but '?' looks milder than '!'.

    If it's meant to be a question, '~じゃないか?' is the natural Japanese.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I found the following sentence somewhere online. It sounds a bit rude written by a non-native Japanese:
    "阿呆か?お前は日本人じゃないか?"
    I'd like to know more in detail about the context and background.
    The sentence is written in Japanese, but you say it was written by a non-native Japanese.
    Is it in a Japanese language forum or something?
    Are you sure if that sentence was written by a non-native Japanese speaker?
    I think it seems quite normal, ordinary and colloquial speech by a native Japanese in Kansai area.
    "Are you kidding? (Don't kid yourself!, Give my a break, will you?)
    You're Japanese, aren't you?"

    It depends on the context though.
    If it is an offensive talk by a non-native Japanese, it would mean:
    "Give me a break, will you? You must be Japanese, mustn't you?"
    "It is very foolish of you to be on Japan's side. You must be Japanese, mustn't you?"
    or something like that.

    I don't know the rudeness of that expression when it was said by a non-native speaker.

    Google Translate is not often reliable.
    It's still not good enough for the practical use.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I'd like to know more in detail about the context and background.
    The sentence is written in Japanese, but you say it was written by a non-native Japanese.
    Is it in a Japanese language forum or something?
    Are you sure if that sentence was written by a non-native Japanese speaker?
    I think it seems quite normal, ordinary and colloquial speech by a native Japanese in Kansai area.
    "Are you kidding? (Don't kid yourself!, Give my a break, will you?)
    You're Japanese, aren't you?"

    It depends on the context though.
    If it is an offensive talk by a non-native Japanese, it would mean:
    "Give me a break, will you? You must be Japanese, mustn't you?"
    "It is very foolish of you to be on Japan's side. You must be Japanese, mustn't you?"
    or something like that.

    I don't know the rudeness of that expression when it was said by a non-native speaker.

    Google Translate is not often reliable.
    It's still not good enough for the practical use.
    The Japanese was written by a doctoral student from China who studied in Japan for his PhD.

    In his story (in Chinese language), he said he once talked online to a Japanese girl who showed him her strong intention to marry a doctor because she highly appreciated doctors.

    She inquired him whether he's a dentist because his special spectacles were much like that of a dentist. He replied with "“阿呆か?お前は日本人じゃないか?医龍の朝田が知らないか?” telling her that it was used by cardiac surgeons.

    In retrospect, he said his reply was impolite because such language was usually used between close friends, basically referring to "Are you foolish? Are you Japanese? Don't you know Asada of Medical Dragon?"

    The girl replied that she didn't watch the movie but she would go to cinema to watch it because she didn't want to be ridiculed by a foreigner...

    A foreigner?He was shocked:Have I betrayed myself by my crappy Japanese grammar?

    So he inquired her how she could have detected out that he's not a Japanese. She told him that a native Japanese would have written アホウ rather than 阿呆.

    Well, it was a romantic story between a Chinese doctoral student and a Japanese girl who continued to correct his Japanese grammar in their communication...
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    If the Japanese passage you brought up is as it is, it shows that he's not native to Japanese. It must have been very apparent to her. 阿呆 or アホウ, either is ok, and there's even more common one. We do feel uneasy when we hear 阿呆か and cannot clearly get the intention of it. It's nice to know from you that it concerns you, NewAmerica. :)
     
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