Are you out/outside?

srknpower

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello,


Assume that I got bored and wanted to visit my mother. Which sentence should I use to learn whether my mother is at home?

And could you explain the difference between them?

Mom are you out?
Mom are you outside?
 
  • srknpower

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Mom are you out? = Are you travelling to town or at the pictures or anywhere not at home?
    Mom are you outside?= Are you in the garden or on the terrace at your home?
    And does “Mom are you outside the home?” mean “Are you in the garden or on the terrace at you home”?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Could you please explain why home is not suitable here?
    No, not really - it is a question of being idiomatic.

    Home is usually seen as an adverb or part of an adverbial phrase.
    Go home! -> go {to your house}
    I am at home -> I am {in my house.}
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Home is usually seen as an adverb or part of an adverbial phrase.
    Go home! -> go {to your house}
    I am at home -> I am {in my house.}
    I know that "home" is an adverb, but what point are you trying to make here - how is your this explanation support the idea that "home" can't be used in the sentence "Mom are you outside the home?"?
    Could you please explain?
     

    srknpower

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    In my opinion, the more natural question would be "Are you at home?"
    In part, yes. But also home is used in certain set circumstances:
    • At home :tick:
    • Towards home :tick:
    • Away from home :tick:
    • Outside home :cross:
    • Inside home :cross:
    No, not really - it is a question of being idiomatic.

    Home is usually seen as an adverb or part of an adverbial phrase.
    Go home! -> go {to your house}
    I am at home -> I am {in my house.}
    Sorry, another question has come to my mind.

    Are out and outside interchangeable here?

    All of the universities in İstanbul will be moved to out of İstanbul.
    All of the universities in İstanbul will be moved to outside İstanbul.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I understand your confusion. In another thread of yours, I suggested you were wrong to delete "to":)

    In your example sentences in this thread, "out of" and "outside" cover the effect of "to". "To" becomes redundant.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Could you please explain the grammatical/logical reason why we can't use "home" with outside/inside?
    The short answer is that in Keith's other 3 examples in #9 he uses the word "home" in its uncountable/metaphorical sense, more as a location than as a physical entity. You can use inside and outside with "home", but only in its countable form, in which it needs an article or other determiner: inside a house, outside his house, beyond that house, in front of the house, etc.

    ———————————————

    Sometimes house and home are interchangeable:
    Inside my house/home I feel secure / There's a policeman stationed outside our house/home

    But the word house does not mean "home".

    House (countable noun) = a residential building
    Home (countable or uncountable noun) = the literal or metaphorical place where someone or something lives or belongs
    Home (adjective)

    We live in a large house. / My house is over there. / I'm inside the house at the moment. / I'm just going to step outside the house for some fresh air / My uncle is a house builder

    An Englishman's home is his castle / There's no place like home / WR is my spiritual home / I feel at home talking to you / We'd better go home now / My grandmother is in an old people's home / His son is now in a children's home / My wiper blades won't return to their home position / If you work outside the home, for example in a shop or office …
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    You can use inside and outside with "home", but only in its countable form, in which it needs an article or other determiner: inside a house, outside his house, beyond that house, in front of the house, etc.
    The places (marked red) where you've written "house", I think you meant to write "home". Right?
     

    hwit

    Member
    English - US (AL)
    Home is an abstract concept and it's possible for it to not even be a building at all. A home is a place where someone lives (or has lived before) and feels comfortable and/or a sense of belonging to it.

    This town is my home.
    Even after moving to England I still call America home.

    It feels a little weird to use outside/inside with home, maybe because home is more of an abstract place?
     
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