Are you up to swim

  • Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi simonaj,

    Although somewhat ambiguous without additional context, I would assume the asker is asking whether or not someone wants to swim at that time. (But if that's the case, I'd change swim to swimming)

    -M
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    I am almost confident that "are you up to" must be followed by a noun, or a gerund(?)

    "Are you up to a swim" means "do you feel like swimming?" or "can you "handle" some swimming?" (if for instance someone was very sick and is now recovering.
     

    simonaj

    Senior Member
    italian, Italy
    I'm wrong, because I meant if someone was able to swim or not. So "are you up to swim/ swimming" doesn't mean this but "feel like"?
     

    MrJamSandwich

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Are you up to swimming?
    Are you fit/well enough to swim?

    Are you up for swimming / Are you up for a swim?
    Do you want to swim?

    Are you up to swim doesn't exist as such - I assume you meant one of the above. Don't worry though - there are many phrases in English that use subtly different combinations of prepositions to give different meanings.

    Something even more subtle: Has anyone else noticed, for example, that situp (emphasis on sit) is a noun - a type of exercise - whereas sit up! (emphasis on both sit and up) is a command urging somebody to alter their posture? Two completely different meanings, with only the slightest of audiable differences - if you're a native speaker, try saying one after the other. Even I got confused!
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I'm wrong, because I meant if someone was able to swim or not. So "are you up to swim/ swimming" doesn't mean this but "feel like"?

    Asking if someone was able to swim or not would normally be phrased as "Can you swim?"

    Asking if someone would care to go swimming with you would normally be phrased as "Are you up for a swim?"
     
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