are you wanting?

  • mancunienne girl

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't have any reservations about it in spoken language. The norm would be to day "do you still want this item", but sometimes you hear people say "are you wanting" coloquially. I wouldn't write it though!
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    Are you still wanting this item as, I have sent you the invoice but have not received payment. Thank you

    Do you still want this item,(COMMA) as I...

    In business, it would be better to write/say:
    Do you still require this item, as I...
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Very odd. You wouldn't normally send an invoice unless a product were shipped or delivered, so the customer wouldn't be wanting it -- he would already have it.

    If you haven't received payment, just say that. If you think they haven't paid you because they haven't received the product, say that. Don't use roundabout language in business transactions -- just say what you mean, taking into consideration things that might have happened.

    Now that I've said all that, what do you intend to say with your sentence?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Do you still want this item? I sent you an invoice but have not received payment.

    Perhaps I don't know enough about eBay, but you can actually send an invoice without someone committing to buying what you're selling?
     
    A buyer commits to buy an item once he or she has won the auction or clicked ButItNow. Then you can pay for it right away without even having the invoice, but when buyers delay the payment, sellers often send an invoice. :)

    By the way, the sentence wasn't mine. It was me who held the payment up. ;)
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks for the added information. Frankly, if someone has committed to buy something, it's an unnecessary courtesy for the seller to ask if they still want it... so it could be construed as simply a polite rhetorical device to segue into "I sent you an invoice but have not received payment."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This is perhaps not the conventional understanding of "want".
    To be wanting <something> can also mean to be without <something>.
    So the question probably means "are you still without this item".
    Put more naturally, "Have you still not received this item? I am asking because I have sent you the invoice and I have not yet received payment."

    The original version of the sentence is a little archaic and as already pointed out it has eccentric punctuation.
     
    Hmm, that's an interesting interpretation. However, I don't think it could specifically be "Have you still not received this item?" because if the item has not been paid for, it's natural that it has not been dispatched (first the payment clears and then the seller ships the item). It would be risky for the sellers if it were otherwise. ;)
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is just colloquial English, in Britain anyway. "Are you still wanting this?" is pretty common and does mean "do you still want this?", not that it is lacking. Yes, if someone has commited to buy on Ebay then they shouldn't need asking if they want the item, but I think it was a prompt by the seller who perhaps didn't know what to say. I'm guessing they don't usually use a formal register when Ebaying and perhaps don't care about their register or don't know about these things!
    If you commit to buy more than one thing from a shop, you can have reduced postage and packaging, in this case the seller has to reinvoice you to change the postage cost which Ebay calculates automatically, that is why something is being invoiced before being sent. The invoice is paid before the goods are dispatched.
     
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