area disepitelizzata

gluca

New Member
italian
Buonasera. Dovrei tradurre in inglese i termini "area disepitelizzata", in riferimento ad un tessuto biologico.
Voi come lo tradurreste?
 
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  • longplay

    Banned
    italian
    Essendo un termine grecoderivato-medico si scrive quasi come in italiano, ma per non sbagliarmi, ti consiglierei di cercare con Google.
     

    gluca

    New Member
    italian
    Ho cercato con google, ma non trovo niente e nemmeno su dizionari medici italiano-inglese
     
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    longplay

    Banned
    italian
    Ciao Mary! Deve controllare il nostro Gluca, ma anche io l' ho fatto. Dato che la tua espressione termina in -liZed, e la mia in -liSed, non sarà mica AE contro
    BE ?:rolleyes:
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Non dico che non si dica "disepithelized", ma è un termine estremamente tecnico. Ne abbiamo un altro, "denuded", che è sempre tecnico ma forse un po' più comune, ma qui mi fermo perché non è il mio campo.:)
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Mi sono accorta che il link che ho inserito nel post #7, che prima funzionava, ora porta ad una pagina di registrazione. Quindi ho cercato altro: http://www.straumann.se/starget-0206.pdf "The remaining facial portion of the anatomic papillae was disepithelized".
    Ciao london, mi arrendo all'evidenza: negli articoli che ho visto, in cui compare il termine da me indicato, gli autori sono quasi sempre italiani. :)
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Non dico che non si dica "disepithelized", ma è un termine estremamente tecnico. Ne abbiamo un altro, "denuded", che è sempre tecnico ma forse un po' più comune, ma qui mi fermo perché non è il mio campo.:)
    Non sono esperta, ma ho trovato qui "denuded". Altro non so. :(


    Approfitto dell'occasione per fare a tutti tantissimi auguri di Buona Pasqua! :)
     
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    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The epithelium is a type of tissue which lines the cavities and structures of the body. If that lining is removed from a piece of tissue it would be de-epithelialised (spelt with a 'z' for AmE).

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/9441824...ciocutaneous-turnover-flap-An-alternative-for

    I'm not a doctor but I'm pretty confident that this is accurate. :rolleyes:
    I found that too, after reading Elemika's post:).

    Did you see my post? It always seems to relate to breast surgery (and as we have no context, we don't know if the OP was referring to that or not when he/she said "area disepitelizzata").:) Plus, two different sources have given the translation as "denuded".

    Therefore, I still think we need a expert opinion here.:)
     

    AshleySarah

    Senior Member
    English - N.Ireland
    LC, as there is no context, the term could relate to any living thing and, if it relates to the human body it could involve any organ at all. We need more context as to what organism it relates to, as well as an expert opinion. :)
     

    elemika

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It always seems to relate to breast surgery (and as we have no context, we don't know if the OP was referring to that or not when he/she said "area disepitelizzata")
    Dear All,
    deepithelialization means epithelium debridment - and in could mean removal of mucosal (click) or of corneal epithelium (click) or of that of periodontal pocket (click) or of some other epithelial lining...(as Sarah says)

    As a result one has epithelium-denuded tissues
    but it seems that de-epithelialization is a more common term in scientific publications. Just an opinion:)

    Maybe
    the choice could depend upon the context (the style of the paper)....:eek:

    Mi aggiungo a Tellure e Gavin con i miei auguri di BuonaPasqua!!!
     
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    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Yes, a deepithelialized area is an area without epithelium (AmE)
    Bic.

    Addition:
    'Denuded' is not incorrect but lacks the specificity of 'deepithelialized'. Denuded just means to strip or make bare, naked and can refer to anything.
     
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    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Addition:
    'Denuded' is not incorrect but lacks the specificity of 'deepithelialized'. Denuded just means to strip or make bare, naked and can refer to anything.
    Not necessarily, according to the various dictionaries I've had a look at.;) It is a medical term as well (see my link to Merriam Webster above).;) And here's another one (from free dictionary):


    denudation ,n stripping bare; the process of removing the outer (epithelial) layer by surgery or disease.
     
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    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Not necessarily, according to the various dictionaries I've had a look at.;) It is a medical term as well (see my link to Merriam Webster above).;) And here's another one (from free dictionary):


    denudation ,n stripping bare; the process of removing the outer (epithelial) layer by surgery or disease.
    Hi LC,
    Let me clarify:
    The word de-epithelialize (AmE) is specific in its meaning in that it tells you what is removed or absent, namely the epithelium. This word is not site specific; in other words, it can be used about any site or part of the body, internal or external, that has an epithelial covering or lining (skin or mucosal surfaces). The opposite process is re-epithelialize, again a specific term that describes what has been put back or grown back. It follows that it would be pointless to use these words about anything but epithelium… and that ‘re- or de-epithelialization of the epithelium’ would be a pleonasm; and herein lies the specificity of this medical term.


    This is in contrast to denudation (noun) or to denude (verb), which lacks the ‘built-in’ specificity of de-epithelialize. You can certainly use denude in a medical context but you will usually indicate what was denuded. And the word in and of itself…taken completely out of context…doesn’t tell you if we’re talking about forestry, geology or medicine. It is not incorrect to use it in the above context, but you would have to specify what is denuded. That’s what my added comment meant.


    An example:
    Background: Mucosal (epithelial) cells from the mouth can be grown (cultured) on human amniotic membranes from which the epithelial lining has been stripped.


    Oral mucosal cells were cultured on denuded human amniotic membranes (OK, but…a little vague as to what and how much of the membranes was denuded)
    Oral mucosal cells were cultured on human amniotic membranes denuded of the epithelium (better…the sentence now specifies what was removed)
    Oral mucosal cells were cultured on de-epithelialized human amniotic membranes (a concise description)

    Bic.
     

    elemika

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Anche in italiano si usa "denudato":

    Vari quadri morfologici sono stati descritti, a parte la classica forma ulcerativa di Hunner per la quale sono diagnostici l'epitelio denudato, l'ulcerazione.....
    Nella forma ulcerosa microscopicamente si possono osservare un'epitelio denudato
    Credo funzioni nello stesso modo come "denuded".

    Grazie, Bic, per una bella spiegazione!
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Anche in italiano si usa "denudato":Credo funzioni nello stesso modo come "denuded".
    Temo che il "denudato" che hai trovato (a parte "un'epitelio" scritto con l'apostrofo, cosa errata!) non sia altro che una traduzione in italiano dell'inglese "denuded", anche perchè tutti i risultati che ho trovato su "epitelio denudato" (solo 5) sono traduzioni dall'inglese come questo o testi del 1800 come questo . A parte questo, dire "epitelio denudato" non mi pare significhi molto, anzi, come dice bicontinental, "would be a pleonasm"; un'area senza epitelio, cioè disepitelizzata, sarebbe "denuded", ma l'epitelio non può essere denudato.
     
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