Argue/talk/push/drag/rush someone into something?

sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!

A- She shouldn't have made that film, now she is regretting for that!
B- It's your entire fault, you argued/talked/pushed/dragged/rushed her into it!!

Would all these verbs have similar meaning to "persuade" or even "convince"? I know they are different but I mean in a context of convince someone to do something with lesser or not degree.

Thanks in advance,

Sam:cool:
 
  • kitenok

    Senior Member
    Hi Sam,

    Would all these verbs have similar meaning to "persuade" or even "convince"?
    "Argued" and "talked" her into it both mean that you used verbal means to persuade or convince her, with "argued" sounding much more forceful. "You pushed her into it" would also probably mean the same thing (with the degree of force being pretty strong), but might also have a broader meaning (maybe you used actual physical force, bribery, etc. -- something other than a verbal argument).

    You "rushed her into it" has a specific connotation that you did not give her enough time to consider the decision seriously enough.

    You "dragged her into it" seems to me to hint that you were part of this film project and brought her into it with you against her will. This may have been done by verbal persuasion or by any other means.

    EDIT: Cross posted with MuttQuad's post 2.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    B- It's your entire fault, you argued/talked/pushed/dragged/rushed her into it! !

    Argued into is not used

    To drag someone into something is to involve them, by association, in a conflict or argument against their will.
    A: "I think John is an idiot."
    B: "No he's not! He's intelligent."
    A: "C says he is an idiot."
    C: "Don't drag me into this argument!
    "

    To rush someone into something is to persuade them by not allowing them insufficient time in which to make a proper decision, so it just fails as far as 'convince' is concerned.

    "I never wanted that car! I should have taken my time. You kept saying what a bargain it was. You rushed me into it!"

    To push someone into something is to persuade them by wearing down their resistance by being persistent.

    "I never wanted that car! I should not have listened to you. You never gave up telling me that I should get it and how good it was!"
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    Argued into is not used
    Surely it is used by some people. The Longman Dictionary actually calls it British English (link), but it sounds normal enough to me as an American. Not as common as "talked into," but entirely comprehensible.

    To drag someone into something is to involve them, by association, in a conflict or argument against their will.
    It can be used this way, but is that really its only meaning? It sounds natural enough to me in Sambistapt's context.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Surely it is used by some people. The Longman Dictionary actually calls it British English (link), but it sounds normal enough to me as an American. Not as common as "talked into," but entirely comprehensible.
    A quick survey shows that no one in the house would accept "argued into" and no one had heard it said. (Vox populi...) I will speak to Mr Longman next time I see him. :)

    It can be used this way, but is that really its only meaning? It sounds natural enough to me in Sambistapt's context.
    Ditto, the vote went the same way - 4:0
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    A quick survey shows that no one in the house would accept "argued into" and no one had heard it said.
    So then I gather that what you meant to type was "Argued into is not used in my household, but other people in this world might find it perfectly acceptable." In that case, we are in total agreement;)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Not at all! I did in fact mean, "As the quality and breadth of intelligence and general knowledge on all matters is particularly high in the household, you make take it that it would be unlikely that there are exceptions to my statement." :D
     
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