around the block

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novice_81

Senior Member
German
Hi

If somebody says: The shop is around the block from the restaurant, it means you have to leave the restaurant, pass one block and there you'll find a shop?
 
  • Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    I visualise a block as group of buildings which back onto each other with no roads between them. Thus we could go left (or right) out of the restaurant, left (or right) at the first street and keep turning left (or right) until we either come back to the restaurant or else find the shop.
     

    novice_81

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi

    So if I said the shop is round the corner from the restaurant, would it be similar?
    I also would have to leave the restaurant, turn left or right, get to the first street and turn again.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I'm not clear what 'around the block' would mean. It would be in the same block (you wouldn't cross any streets), but I'm not sure whether you make one right-angled turn (so it's the same as 'round the corner') or two right-angled turns (so you have to go right round to the other side of the block). Probably the latter, since 'round the corner' is available for the one-turn location. But AmE uses 'block' more than BrE, and it may be different in AmE.
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    A three sided block would mean that the shop would be around the corner, while a four sided block would only have right angle turns if the town/city were built on a grid pattern. Old cities tend not to be built this way so a block could have five or more sides.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In standard American English, if something is around the block (for a square or rectangular block) it means you make two turns and wind up on the opposite side that you started from.

    Around the corner is only one turn.

    To "go around the block" means you make four turns and end up exactly where you started.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    In standard American English, if something is around the block (for a square or rectangular block) it means you make two turns and wind up on the opposite side that you started from.

    Around the corner is only one turn.
    Yes to the underlined expression. For the first, "Turn left/right at the corner, and then left/right again at the next corner.", maybe.
     
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