Around the world to be

  • lekal

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It indicates the purpose for which he took her around the world.
    Thank you. But what is the purpose? By his side? But I thought " by his side" is a situation not a purpose.
    And if "to be" were omitted here, would this sentence still have the same meaning?
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "He took her around the world [in order for her] to be by his side."
    The phrase that makes purpose clearer is "in order to":
    "I opened the window in order to let in some fresh air." (= ...with the purpose of letting fresh air come in)
    But "in order to" is often reduced to a simple "to" ("I opened the window to let in some air.").
    Your example from Noah is further complicated by a change of subject:
    He took her around the world so that she would be by his side.
     

    lekal

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "He took her around the world [in order for her] to be by his side."
    The phrase that makes purpose clearer is "in order to":
    "I opened the window in order to let in some fresh air." (= ...with the purpose of letting fresh air come in)
    But "in order to" is often reduced to a simple "to" ("I opened the window to let in some air.").
    Your example from Noah is further complicated by a change of subject:
    He took her around the world so that she would be by his side.
    Thank you.
    Can I say " He took her around the world to let her accompany him on his tour" ?
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Yes. "Let", here, would mean that she wanted to accompany him, and he gave her permission to do so.
     
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