Arrange for a book

My teacher asked the children to get their english textbooks but they were not available in the market . Our teacher said:
Could you not arrange for english textbook till now?Why don't you ask for it from your seniors?
Here arrange for means get english textbook because it is not available. And can till now be used in this sense?
Thank you
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    My teacher asked the children to get buy their English textbook but they were not available in the market.
    Our teacher said:
    "Could you not arrange for english textbook till now?" Why didn't you get the English textbook? Why didn't you ask for it from your seniors (Do you mean "older brothers and sisters"?) for their copy?
    Here arrange for means get English textbook because it is not available.
    :confused: Do you mean "place an order for" the textbook?

    And can till now be used in this sense?
    No.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No, none of that is idiomatic. If you’ve all turned up for class without the required book, the teacher would be talking about it in the past tense. For example: “Couldn’t you have found a way to get the book before now? Why didn’t you…?”


    cross-posted
     
    By taking the book from our seniors.
    Can we use:
    You guys should arrange for books. If they are not available in the market , then take it from your seniors. But please arrange for your english books.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    “Arrange for books” is not good English. Arrange is not the best word to use in this context anyway, but if for some reason you did want to use it, you would have to rephrase, for example: arrange to get hold of the book.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    You can say "arrange for" <agent> to <verb>. "Arrange for Pavarotti to sing... Arrange for your brother to meet a new girl."

    Also: "Arrange for" + noun, but it has to be a situation where the arrangement is clear. "Can you arrange for a meal when our guests arrive?" is OK. "Arrange for a textbook" doesn't work.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Use whatever verb is appropriate, e.g. get hold of the book, acquire the book, obtain the book, buy the book, borrow the book, find the book, etc., etc.

    The main meanings of arrange are to “put (things) in a neat, attractive, or required order”
    OR to “organise or make plans for (a future event)”
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would like to know who 'seniors' refers to. I suspect that it means older students in the school. In that case, the verb could be 'borrow'.
    If 'seniors' means 'parents', a suitable verb might be to 'order' or 'obtain'.
    Apologies if this has already been mentioned. I have a very low tolerance level these days. Somebody here needs to mind their own business.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    As with many other recent threads, this arises from a translation of the equivalent Hindi phrase, and is commonly used in Indian English. "Arrange for" here means "to obtain by whatever means possible", or "Do what it takes". In this context it's similar to the English phrase "beg, borrow or steal".

    The OP does mean older students by "seniors" - students who'd have used the book earlier when they were in that class/grade.

    Could you not arrange for english textbook till now?
    Couldn't you do anything to get your English textbooks?

    I agree with Lingobingo's suggestions in #3 and #10 too.

    Please note that "English" is always capitalised.
     
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