article features photo of

  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Superman article features photo of Clayton Collyer, the radio actor-announcer who plays Superman" is short-form English: it's just an abbreviated description.

    Written out, it would look like this:
    "The Superman article (in this issue) features a photo of Clayton Collyer, the radio actor-announcer who plays Superman."

    "Features" here is a verb that just means the article also has a photo, rather than just being a text article.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I very much doubt it. The topic, subject or theme is "Superman". The article consists mainly of writing (that is what "article" means in this context), but it is common for articles also to include photographs, and in this case one of the most important photographs is of Clayton Collyer.

    Your original sentence is either missing the indefinite article before "photo", or "photos" should be plural. It is possible for several things (especially if they are related) to be featured in articles.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I very much doubt it. The topic, subject or theme is "Superman". The article consists mainly of writing (that is what "article" means in this context), but it is common for articles also to include photographs, and in this case one of the most important photographs is of Clayton Collyer.

    Your original sentence is either missing the indefinite article before "photo", or "photos" should be plural. It is possible for several things (especially if they are related) to be featured in articles.

    Is it interpreted as "Superman photo is one of the aspects of the article" or "the article have that photo as a feature." How can you also understand in this case one of the most important photographs is of Clayton? Does the case stand in for "the article" itself? If so, it implies that article have other photos.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top