article 'the' why?

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Annakrutitskaya

Senior Member
Russian
Dear Native Speakers,

According to rules (Englishpage.com), article 'the' (apart from all other usages):

is used with the names of institutes, museums, theaters, hotels but is not used with the names of universities, colleges, hospitals, stadiums.

What is the logic behind this difference?

For example:
He has graduated from Harvard University vs He has graduated from the Karuna Institute.

My initial idea was that universities combine activities of a broader spectrum then institutes, but then I realized that it is not always the case. Museums and theaters can have a more narrow combination of activities and a broader one as well.

Thank you!

<< Mod note: Source added in post #8.
:) >>
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If there is any logic behind that custom, I don't know what it is.

    However, the advice sounds generally right to me: The Museum of Modern Art, Notre Dame University, Penrose Hospital, Sky Sox Stadium
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hello Owlman,
    I was hoping to get your answer and I was expecting some insights from you :) It seems that I truly have to remember these rules on articles and propositions and not seek any logic behind them - difficult task for me :)
    Thank you for answering.
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think it's as simple as that, at least in British/Commonwealth/ ex-Commonwealth nations.

    We often use "the" with universities , mostly when they contain a place name:
    The University of Oxford/Toronto/ Sydney/Queensland/Hong Kong/Canterbury... Also The Open University, The Queen's College (Oxford) etc.

    And also some hospitals, for example :

    The Portland Hospital (London), The Royal Women's Hospital (Melbourne), The Princess Alexandra Hospital (Brisbane)...

    And as for stadia: The Millennium Stadium (Cardiff), The Gabba (Brisbane), The Olympic Stadium (London)...

    Don't know if there is any logic there!
     
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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    We often use "the" with universities , mostly when they contain a place name:
    The University of Oxford/Toronto/ Sydney/Queensland/Hong Kong/Canterbury..
    This moves into another area, namely that sometimes the article "the" is part of the formal name and sometimes it is not, but we still use the article when referring to the institution.

    According to http://www.utoronto.com/ the formal name is "University of Toronto," but according to http://www.theportlandhospital.com/ it's "The Portland Hospital."

    I graduated from the University of Colorado, not from Colorado State University. We use "the" in connection with, but not as part of the name where "University of Colorado" is concerned, but not Colorado State.

    Ergo the source you mention (but you didn't give us a link to the appropriate page) is simply wrong about it being a "rule." You just have to learn them.
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    The problem reminds me of another area where the article (definite) may or may not be part of the official name: I'm referring to rock (or other) groups.

    The Beatles declare...
    The Rolling Stones insist ...

    but

    Take That declare

    This is especially addressed to my Italian compatriots, who will stubbornly use an (italian) definite article and a plural verb when referring to any rock band. (I Take That dichiarano...).
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The site does admit to a few exceptions, but there are far too many exceptions to many items on the lists to consider the broad generalities to be "rules."

    The information is presented poorly and this, unfortunately, is not the place to list them all.
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The site does admit to a few exceptions, but there are far too many exceptions to many items on the lists to consider the broad generalities to be "rules."

    The information is presented poorly and this, unfortunately, is not the place to list them all.
    Can you recommend a better source for English grammar? Thank you
     
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