Articulation

ghk0603

New Member
Korean
When you use this word "articulation" ?

I don't know full meaning of this word by understanding only dictionary of wordreference and wikipedia.

Articulatory is adjective?

Articulation is a basic form, right?

Thanks.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello ghk0603, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    I don't know which is the basic form - maybe the verb 'to articulate' upon which the other two are built. Let's have a look:
    articulate:
    ▶verb /ɑːˈtɪkjʊleɪt/ 
    • 1 pronounce (words) distinctly. ■ clearly express (an idea or feeling).

    • 2 form a joint. ■ (be articulated) be connected by joints.

    – derivatives
    articulable adjective,
    articulacy noun,
    articulated adjective,
    articulately adverb,
    articulateness noun,
    articulatory adjective.
    – origin C16: from L. articulat-, articulare ‘divide into joints, utter distinctly’, from articulus
    Well one out of two. ;)
    articulation:
    articulation/ɑːtɪkjuˈleɪʃn/
    ▶noun
    • 1 the formation of clear and distinct sounds in speech. ■ the action of putting an idea into words.
      ■ Phonetics the formation of a speech sound by constriction of the air flow in the vocal organs.

    • 2 Music clarity in the production of successive notes.

    • 3 the state of being jointed. ■ a specified joint.
    Does this help? :)
     

    ghk0603

    New Member
    Korean
    I wanna know the use or example sentences in real circumastances.
    Because Its meaning is not obivous to me.
    Maybe We Korean don't use that expression many times.
     

    ghk0603

    New Member
    Korean
    Thank you for explaining means. I wanna know more about that expression in real world. Do you often use that word in your life ?
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I don't think I've ever used "articulation" in a sentence (until now:D) I have talked about an "articulated lorry" or learned about "articulated joints" in biology, but that's all!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank you for explaining means. I wanna know more about that expression in real world. Do you often use that word in your life ?
    Hi ghk0603

    If you want to find "real world" examples of articulation, then a good way to do it is to put articulation into the search box at the top of the page, then hit the 'in context' button. That will take you to current Google News examples of the word: click.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Harlan Corban, the author, has a character that answers the phone with the single word, "Articulate". It appealed to me. But whenever I used it people were just confused.

    Other than that, the only time I discuss "articulation" is with my rheumatologist while discussing the progression of my arthritis.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello ghk0603,

    In this forum, we are most likely to use 'articulation' in the second sense given in post #2 above:
    1 the formation of clear and distinct sounds in speech.
    ■ the action of putting an idea into words.
    Phonetics the formation of a speech sound by constriction of the air flow in the vocal organs.​


    This is an example of the "articulation" used as it is in phonics, with the second meaning.
    I suggest that a great deal depends on the context.
    Under instruction from my Music Director, there is a clear articulation of about - the and band - that, with a perceptible break between them.

    Under normal conversation, or even in formal speech, that perceptible break would vanish, but there would still be a substantial difference between the "-tth-" or "-dth-" and a simple "-th-".
    This contrasts with what I understand to be the kind of assimilation to be observed in "great day".
    Will you please tell us why you are asking this question? Did you see articulation used in a sentence? If so, what was the topic? Is it on a list of words? If it was a list, what sort list was it?
     
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