as (a) hostess / as (a) lecturer / as (a) thinker

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Paganini was a great violinist. .
My daughter is training as a radiologist.
We found Lisbon (to be) a delightful city.
What a miserable day (it is)!


Whereas the indefinite article is required in the previous examples, there is vacillation in the following cases:

her duties as (a) hostess
my appointment as (a) lecturer
Jung as (a) thinker
("A comprehensive grammar of the English language")

Do they mean it's not necessary to use 'a' in the last three sentences? But they are countable nouns. What does that mean? Or do they act as titles/ranks in this case?
Thank you.
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "As" has a number of functions.
    "Her duties as a hostess" = the duties that she has whenever she acts as a hostess.
    "Her duties as hostess" = the duties that she has as the (one and only) hostess of a specific event. Yes, sort of a "title".
    "My appointment as Lecturer"—without the article, I would be inclined to give it an uppercase L, as definitely a title.
    "Jung as thinker"—perhaps in contrast to other roles he might have had, such as therapist, family man, etc.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    her duties as (a) hostess
    my appointment as (a) lecturer
    Jung as (a) thinker

    Do they mean it's not necessary to use 'a' in the last three sentences?
    Those are not sentences; they're isolated phrases. Whether the indefinite article is necessary or not in each case will depend on its use in a sentence. The question's not possible to answer definitively otherwise. That's why we always ask for a full sentence.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top