as a majority of Greek voters effectively demanded by backing parties that wanted revisions to those terms

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goophy

Senior Member
Taiwanese, Mandarin Chinese
Hi,

I was puzzled by the following passge, especially the blue part from Europe braced for turmoil as Greece fears take their toll:

The Bundesbank, Germany’s central bank, said in a firmly worded monthly report that it viewed as unacceptable any relaxation of the terms of Greece’s bailout – as a majority of Greek voters effectively demanded by backing parties that wanted revisions to those terms.
My question is: Who wanted revisions to those terms? Greek voters or backing parties?

Could anyone explain the blue part as simple as possible?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    There should be a comma after "demanded", then it's clear that the Greek voters demanded relaxation of the terms, which is proved by the fact that they backed the parties who want the revisions.
     

    goophy

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese, Mandarin Chinese
    But what about 'demanded by'? Does'nt it mean that the Greek voters are demanded by the backing parties? I am so confused!
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The sentence could have been worded better, I admit. But it isn't "demanded by". You can say "a majority of Greek voters effectively demanded a relaxation of the terms of Greece's bailout". "We know this because "they backed (voted for) the parties that wanted revisions to those terms".
     

    goophy

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese, Mandarin Chinese
    Thanks, velisarius. But still, I don't understand the usage of 'by' here. What is its function here?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The "by" goes with "backing". Example: I showed my dislike of the Prime Minister by backing his opponent. I do something by means of some action.
     

    goophy

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese, Mandarin Chinese
    Ah! I see it now. Back is used as a verb. I misread 'backing' as an adjective; that's why I didn't understand the whole passage. Now, it's clear to me.
     
    Last edited:
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