as advertised/which was advertised

marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would please ask you if both versions are correct in the following:
A few weeks ago, Susan applied by email to a private banking graduate position, (as advertised)/(which was advesrtised) on the career section of her universite website.
 
  • agreva3

    Member
    English - Long Island, NY, USA
    I'm not sure about how others might respond towards 'as advertised', but my instinct is to only accept 'which was advertised' in this context. When I hear 'as advertised', I usually believe that the context is some kind of product promotion, but this sentence is simply describing Susan's actions.

    Also, some other notes ...

    1) I would change 'on' to 'in'.

    2) I would change 'of' to 'on' (just for a smoother sound).

    3) I would change 'universite' to 'university's'.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Also (in the UK anyway), you apply for, not to, a job. And I'd suggest changing a private banking graduate position to a graduate position in private banking.

    Examples of how to use "as advertised":
    I returned the goods because they were not as advertised.
    A fundraising dinner is to take place next month, as advertised in the latest newsletter.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    I'm not sure about how others might respond towards 'as advertised', but my instinct is to only accept 'which was advertised' in this context. When I hear 'as advertised', I usually believe that the context is some kind of product promotion, but this sentence is simply describing Susan's actions.

    Also, some other notes ...

    1) I would change 'on' to 'in'.

    2) I would change 'of' to 'on' (just for a smoother sound).

    3) I would change 'universite' to 'university's'.
    Also (in the UK anyway), you apply for, not to, a job. And I'd suggest changing a private banking graduate position to a graduate position in private banking.

    Examples of how to use "as advertised":
    I returned the goods because they were not as advertised.
    A fundraising dinner is to take place next month, as advertised in the latest newsletter.
    Thank you, agreva3 and lingobingo, for your detailed suggestions.
    To agreva: if you replace on her university's website with on the University of Florida's website, would it be correct to use the Saxon Genitive?
    To Lingobingo: I have quite often heard use apply to in place of apply for. Did you ever come across this type of construction?
     
    Last edited:

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    You apply to a company for a job. You can't apply for a company, or to a job. So you won't see or hear 'apply to' being used in place of 'apply for'.
    Hi Heypresto, and thanks for your reply. But, for example, I am pretty sureto have heard apply to our Graduate Programme or apply to X Inc.'s Graduate Programme.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You apply to a company for a job. You can't apply for a company, or to a job. So you won't see or hear 'apply to' being used in place of 'apply for'.
    :thumbsup:

    Hi Heypresto, and thanks for your reply. But, for example, I am pretty sure to have heard apply to our Graduate Programme or apply to X Inc.'s Graduate Programme.
    That's correct but entirely different. You apply for a job / position / passport / ID card / parking permit / mortgage / loan / a college place, etc, etc. These are all things that you want to get/acquire.

    In order to set the wheels in motion to acquire any of these things, you apply to a company, Government department, local council, bank, university, etc.

    The term apply to also can also apply to other situations! :)
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Also (in the UK anyway), you apply for, not to, a job. And I'd suggest changing a private banking graduate position to a graduate position in private banking.

    Examples of how to use "as advertised":
    I returned the goods because they were not as advertised.
    A fundraising dinner is to take place next month, as advertised in the latest newsletter.
    Thank you, lingobingo. And, what about using the expression in bold, as follows:
    A few weeks ago, Susan applied for the position of X, which she found advertised in the career section on her university's website.
     

    TNdaSZ

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Susan applied for the position of X, as advertised in the career section on her university's website.
    Susan applied for the position of X, which was advertised in the career section on her university's website.

    They are different. The first one is definitive. The second one is non-definitive.
    The first one means "Susan applied for the position of X advertised in the career section on her university's website. (There might be positions of X advertised somewhere else")
    The second one means, "Susan applied for the position of X, and it was advertised in the career section on her university's website.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    We can't tell from either sentence if the job was advertised anywhere else. All we know is that it was advertised on her university's website. The sentences are identical in meaning to me.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’m afraid I agree. It’s a pointless distinction — and to suggest that “which” means “and it” is simply misleading.
     

    TNdaSZ

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    I’m afraid I agree. It’s a pointless distinction — and to suggest that “which” means “and it” is simply misleading.
    Why is misleading?
    " Tom is smart, which is obvious."

    " Tom is smart and it is obvious."

    They look interchangeable to me.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I meant that it’s misleading (for English learners) to give the impression that the relative pronoun “which” means (your word) the same as the conjunction+pronoun combination “and it”. They perform different grammatical functions, and if sometimes you could use either in a particular sentence without radically changing the meaning, that’s simply coincidental.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top