(as)...as [comparison]

Rumo333

Member
German - Germany
Hey!
I've got another question, and I'm not quite sure if this has been discussed before yet. I know I can say, for example:

He's as smart as a cabbage.

Of course, this would be pretty colloquial, and if it comes to colloquial speech, could I also use?:

He's smart as a cabbage. ??

I've searched, but I didn't find anything that met my request.

Thanks a lot in advance
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, the first as is frequently omitted, Rumo, especially in speech.

    As for cabbages being smart ... well, I've never met one I could hold an interesting conversation with ... but that's a separate question.
     

    Rumo333

    Member
    German - Germany
    Hey, ewie!
    Thanks very much! I honestly didn't find anything about this, so thank you very much.
    That sentence was just an example I had come up with.
    By the way, I didn't mean to express that cabbages are smart (in any way), but that the person ('he') you are talking about is as smart as one, meaning very dumb.
    Okay, I finally realize that it doesn't make much sense.
    Anyway, thanks! :)

    Rumo
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    By the way, I didn't mean to express that cabbages are smart (in any way), but that the person ('he') you are talking about is as smart as one, meaning very dumb.
    Okay, I finally realize that it doesn't make much sense.
    Oh I see. It makes perfect sense once you know it's meant sarcastically:):thumbsup: (And is actually pretty funny:D)
     

    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    Hm.. Interesting.

    Wouldn't there be a difference between as... as and one as?
    e.g.

    He's as smart as a cabbage - would imply that cabbages are smart
    He's smart as a cabbage - would imply that that cabbages are stupid and he is about smart as a cabbage

    No?
     
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