as...as..

abre

Member
French
Hello!

If i want to say /P is as knowledgeable about African lizards as is Q./

Do we need the (is) before Q, why isn’t it after Q. ?

Besides Can we drop the (is)?


Would you mind give me more details about it. i would appreciate it!
Thanks a lot in advance!
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Do we need the (is) before Q
    No.

    why isn’t it after Q. ?
    It's implied, but usually omitted.

    Besides Can we drop the (is)?
    Yes. Usually.

    Sometimes there might be some ambiguity, like for instance in 'John likes Lucy as much as James.'

    It could mean either that John likes Lucy as much as James does. (as much as James likes Lucy). Or it could mean that John likes Lucy as much as he likes James. So in a situation like this, we would avoid the ambiguity and make it clear what we mean. In your sentence there is no ambiguity, and so we don't need to add 'is' at the end.
     

    abre

    Member
    French
    No.


    It's implied, but usually omitted.


    Yes. Usually.

    Sometimes there might be some ambiguity, like for instance in 'John likes Lucy as much as James.'

    It could mean either that John likes Lucy as much as James does. (as much as James likes Lucy). Or it could mean that John likes Lucy as much as he likes James. So in a situation like this, we would avoid the ambiguity and make it clear what we mean. In your sentence there is no ambiguity, and so we don't need to add 'is' at the end.
    Thanks for your reply!
    so if it means " John likes Lucy as much as he likes James." can we say John likes Lucy as much as he likes James or there may be some other simple ways to say it?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can't think of a simpler or shorter way to say that without being potentially ambiguous.

    Often, the context in which something is said, and the way it's spoken, will reduce the ambiguity, as the listener will use context and common sense to understand the speaker. But there is no harm in avoiding any ambiguity and making it clear.
     

    abre

    Member
    French
    I can't think of a simpler or shorter way to say that without being potentially ambiguous.

    Often, the context in which something is said, and the way it's spoken, will reduce the ambiguity, as the listener will use context and common sense to understand the speaker. But there is no harm in avoiding any ambiguity and making it clear.
    Thank you for your response
     
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