as being too bourgeois / the meaning of 'as'

shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Hello folks.


Source: word smart

Bourgeois
A hip young city dweller might reject life in the suburbs as being too bourgeois.

I'll try to reword the above sentence.

A hip young city dweller might reject life in the suburbs because it(=life in the suburbs) is too bourgeois.

In this case, 'as' in the sentence means 'because'?

And if so, Is it(=as being) grammatically ok?


Thank you so much for your help. :)
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Yes. Your rewording/paraphrasing makes sense, and keeps the meaning.

    "as" doesn't really mean "because".

    ... suburbs as being too bourgeois ...
    ... suburbes because it's too bourgeois ...

    But, I guess you sort of said that too. I'm pretty confident you are right, shorty! :)
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Yes. Your rewording/paraphrasing makes sense, and keeps the meaning.

    "as" doesn't really mean "because".

    ... suburbs as being too bourgeois ...
    ... suburbes because it's too bourgeois ...

    But, I guess you sort of said that too. I'm pretty confident you are right, shorty! :)

    Thank you so much, perpend. :)

    I get it.

    Sorry to bother you but could you check one more thing?


    http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/as
    as(preposition)
    2 — used to indicate the condition, role, job, etc., of someone or something ▪ Then she spoke as a child [=she was a child when she spoke then], but now she is speaking as an adult. ▪ He has a job as an editor. ▪ The policeman disguised himself as a beggar. ▪ Some people were surprised by his election as Governor. ▪ The critics praised his performance as Othello. ▪ I like her both as a poet and as a novelist. ▪ As a pacifist, I'm against all wars. ▪ Everyone rose as one. [=everyone rose together]

    The 'as' in the original sentence happens to apply to the above definition?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Reject life in the suburbs as being too bourgeois" I would paraphrase this as: "reject life in the suburbs on the grounds that it is too bourgeois."
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/as
    as(preposition)
    2 — used to indicate the condition, role, job, etc., of someone or something ▪ Then she spoke as a child [=she was a child when she spoke then], but now she is speaking as an adult. ▪ He has a job as an editor. ▪ The policeman disguised himself as a beggar. ▪ Some people were surprised by his election as Governor. ▪ The critics praised his performance as Othello. ▪ I like her both as a poet and as a novelist. ▪ As a pacifist, I'm against all wars. ▪ Everyone rose as one. [=everyone rose together]

    The 'as' in the original sentence happens to apply to the above definition?
    No, that meaning of "as" does not happen to apply to your original sentence, for me.

    I agree with velisarius' interpretation.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you so much for your time and answering the question, velisarius and perpend. :)


    Many critics have objected to the proposal on the grounds that [=because] it would be too costly.

    As I inferred it at first, it must mean 'reason'.

    I get it.

    I'll take it that in this case 'As being' is grammatically incorrect.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    A hip young city dweller might reject life in the suburbs as being too bourgeois.

    I'll try to reword the above sentence.

    A hip young city dweller might reject life in the suburbs because it(=life in the suburbs) is too bourgeois.
    "as being" is fine. I think we're on different pages as to how your construction is grammatically correct.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    "as being" is fine. I think we're on different pages as to how your construction is grammatically correct.
    I thought 'as' couldn't be followed by being(gerund) when 'as' was used as a conjunction.

    I must have taken it wrong way.

    I get it.
     
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