(as) compared to/with

Steaming

New Member
AE
In the sentence: "The advantage of a bike, as compared to a car with a diesel engine, is that a bike doesn't emit exhaust fumes"

my question is about commas and whether "(as) compared to a bus with a diesel engine" should be moved into the beginning of the sentence? I'd like to get the most common phrasing, although this is how it appears in the original. Google hits do not give a clear idea.
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You can (not should) start your sentence with "Compared to ...". I don't know whether this is a more common word order; both seem equally possible to me.
    But there is no need to repeat a bike, i.e. write "is that it".
     

    Steaming

    New Member
    AE
    You can (not should) start your sentence with "Compared to ...". I don't know whether this is a more common word order; both seem equally possible to me.
    But there is no need to repeat a bike, i.e. write "is that it".
    Dear e2efour,

    Thank you very much for your answer.
    I am terribly sorry I didn't respond to this on time. This was an intense project with a very tight deadline.
    You're right, of course, the second 'bike' should get out of the way. It all becomes so much clearer and lighter.
    I appreciate your help.
    St.
     
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