as far as I know / to my knowledge

  • Annoy

    New Member
    Romanian
    Hello Annoy, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    Could you make your question a little clearer please? I think you are asking whether 'as far as I know' means the same as 'to my knowledge' - is that right? :)
    First of all, thank you for you excuse my hurry and secondly : yes, is there a difference?
    Regards,
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    There are circumstances in which they can mean the same thing as each other, but there are also circumstances in which they don't mean the same thing as each other.

    'As far as I know', it seems to me, always allows the for the possibility of the utterer being wrong. - (means 'I believe')

    Whereas, 'to my knowledge', is sometimes (i.e. not exclusively) intended to emphasise the certainty of the rest of the sentence. - (can mean 'I know')


    It will be easier to answer your question when you provide us with some context (Forum rule #3) :)
     

    Annoy

    New Member
    Romanian
    Dear friend, thank you so very much for your answer and please do forgive me i only reply to you so late, as i usually do have very little time for the internet. Regards!
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    To me, "as far as I know" means exactly the same as "to my knowledge". [Note that "I" is always capitalized in English.]

    P.S.: Welcome to the forum! :)
     

    Annoy

    New Member
    Romanian
    Oh, thank you so much. And ya, I knew the personal pronouns are capitalized in English, like they are also in German, too. Regards!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Pertinax

    Senior Member
    BrE->AuE
    I think that there is a BrE/AmE distinction here.

    "To my knowledge" to me means what is sometimes rendered "To my certain knowledge".
    I was quite perplexed recently when I heard someone use "To my knowledge" to mean what I would say as "To the best of my knowledge" or "As far as I know".

    However, looking back a few centuries in Google Books, it seems that the phrase "to my knowledge" was originally used in either sense, but that the former sense became more common in BrE, while the latter sense became dominant in AmE. Under modern AmE influence the latter sense looks set to reconquer its old territory.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Interesting. I wonder if its position in the sentence changes the meaning of 'to my knowledge'.

    Not sure if this is off-topic, but when I say 'not to my knowledge', I'm pretty sure that I mean 'not as far as I know'.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top