As far as I know

Etcetera

Senior Member
Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
Hi all,

I was once told by my English teacher that it's better to say "to my knowledge" instead of "as far as I know". But in fact, most native speakers, at least here at WR, use the latter. Is there any difference between those two expressions?

Thanks in advance. :)
 
  • Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Etcetera,

    No, I'd say there is no difference in the meaning. I prefer "as far as I know" because idiomatic expressions generally sound better, at least to my ears. "To my knowledge" has a literal, non-idiomatic meaning. The former can sound a little stiff and bland, but it is used, in fact :) Hope it helps!

    -M
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    I guessed the difference must be pure stylistic, but I wanted to know what native speakers of English have to say about it.
    Thank you very much, Sally and Moogey! :)
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Instead of 'to my knowledge' a better and more usual expression is 'to the best of my knowledge'. The only difference vs. 'as far as I know' would be who you were talking to, the latter being a little more familiar.
     

    Bil

    Banned
    English USA
    Hi

    Gosh, who's to say whether one expression is better than another. In this case, both are acceptable. Still, if used indiscriminately, the use of 'to my knowledge' could be perceived as conveying a trace of condescension. Whereas, the phrase 'as far as I know' never poses that risk, that's to say, it doesn't to the best of my knowledge, I mean, to the extent of my understanding on the subject, that is, to the degree that I've given any thought to the matter. :)

     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    Hi

    Gosh, who's to say whether one expression is better than another. In this case, both are acceptable. Still, if used indiscriminately, the use of 'to my knowledge' could be perceived as conveying a trace of condescension. Whereas, the phrase 'as far as I know' never poses that risk, that's to say, it doesn't to the best of my knowledge, I mean, to the extent of my understanding on the subject, that is, to the degree that I've given any thought to the matter. :)
    Thank you, Bil! :)
    A wonderful explanation. :)
     
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