As far as traffic is concerned / When it comes to / In terms of

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Anushka Athukorala

Senior Member
Sinhalese
Hello Teachers
I'd like to know the differences among these 3 phrases. I have looked them up in my dictionary but the definitions given there a bit confusing because they seem quite similar to each other but they don't say if they are synonyms. so I thought of asking this question from a native speaker so that I can have a better understanding of its use. I have also mentioned the examples given there in my thread. I would appreciate if you could explain them.

1. as far as something is concerned eg: As far as traffic is concerned there are no delays at the moment.
< -- Other example should have its own thread. Cagey, moderator. >

Teachers I would also like to know if I can use them interchangeably with the same meaning as below. please correct them if they are wrong.
1. In terms of traffic there are no delays at the moment.
2.When it comes to traffic there are no delays at the moment.
< --- Relates to other examples. Cagey, moderator. >

Thank you
Anushka
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello, Anushka Athukorala. :)

    It's difficult to discuss three variations of three sentences in one thread, so I have reduced the sentences to one.
    When that one has been discussed, your question may have been answered.

    However, if it isn't, you are welcome to start a thread for each of the other two sentences.

    Cagey, moderator.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I would use these if you were considering several factors that might make you late, for instance;

    As far as traffic is concerned, there are no delays at the moment. However, it's a curvy road and you'll have to drive slowly.
    When it comes to traffic, there are no delays at the moment. However, it's a curvy road and you'll have to drive slowly.​

    To me, "In terms of traffic" doesn't fit here.
     

    Anushka Athukorala

    Senior Member
    Sinhalese
    Hello Cagey

    Thank you very much for answering my question. What I understood from your answer is that we can use both As far as something is concerned and When it comes to something interchangeably. I also would like to know if these two can always be used like this.I made several sentence below.Please correct them if they are wrong.

    As far as money is concerned, the job is not a good source of income.
    when it comes to money, the job is not a good source of income.

    As far as it's faults are concerned, we can not sell it at all.
    when it comes to it's faults, we can not sell it at all.

    As far as your sales are concerned, we can not keep you in the company any further.
    when it comes to your sales, we can not keep you in the company any further.

    I would also like to know if I can use "in terms of" in the contexts above with the same meaning.

    Thank you
    Anushka
     
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