'As' for contrast

happy12

Member
Australian English
Hi Guys!

In the following sentence: "The good teacher consciously recognizes the dramatic possibilities in his profession as the average or second-rate teacher does not". Is 'as' correct in this sentence for contrasting. It doesn't sound right to me. I've checked myself but would like a second opinion!!It's the 'does not' that's bothering me!!



Many thanks
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This "as" sounds odd to me. The sentence seems to be saying that the good teacher recognizes these possibilities but the average teacher does not. I don't get the sense that this is comparing ways of recognizing these possibilities. I am leaning towards "The good teacher consciously recognizes the dramatic possibilities in his profession, whereas the average or second-rate teacher does not."
     

    Jam on toast

    Senior Member
    UK
    British English
    It sounds a little odd to me, but I get the meaning. The part after "as" is really redundant, and it only serves to repeat and emphasise the first part by restating its counterpart.

    For a sentence like that, I would use "just as" in place of "as".

    With respect to "does not", I read "teacher" to be subject and "average or second rate" to be two alternative adjectives.
     
    Last edited:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's not exactly the word 'as' that's unhappy here, but the concept. We have the same problem if we reword it:

    A good teacher recognizes the possibilities in the way a bad teacher doesn't.

    We know what it means, but both versions seem to be saying "there's a way that a bad teacher doesn't do things". If they don't do it, they don't do it in any particular way.
     

    happy12

    Member
    Australian English
    Thank you so much for all your help. This sentence was given by a cram school teacher to a student, and for the life of me I couldn't explain if it was right or wrong!!
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Interesting that we have native English speakers who interpret this differently. I am with se16teddy in seeing it as a perfectly normal construction with exactly that meaning, where as = in a way in which

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