as good a claim as

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inbetweeness

Member
Indonesia, Bahasa Indonesia as native language
Dear all,
I found this sentence in a book:
He has as good a claim as anyone to have developed a critical social science.

I'm confused about the usage of the phrase 'as good a claim as' in the sentence since a noun is put in the form of 'as...as'. Could you explain gramatically what such a word composition means?

Thank you. :)
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The basic reason for this is that when an adjective precedes a noun ('a good claim', 'a better claim'), it usually can't have anything after it modifying it :)cross:'a better than yours claim', :cross:'an as good as anyone claim'). So if you want to put a comparative phrase ('better than yours', 'as good as anyone') in front of a noun, you can't put all of it there - only the part up to the adjective. The rest of it has to follow the noun.

    a better claim than yours
    as good a claim as anyone

    The alternative is to put the whole comparative phrase after the noun:

    a claim better than yours
    a claim as good as anyone
     

    inbetweeness

    Member
    Indonesia, Bahasa Indonesia as native language
    Thank you,entangledbank,both for the prompt answer and explanation. It really helps.

    Greetings from Indonesia :)
     
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