as interesting as garlic skin

Nunty

Modified
Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
This is a Hebrew idiom, as in "So the contractor started to tell me he couldn't finish on time because his sister-in-law crashed her car, so his wife lent her her car, so he had to pick up the children at school and bring them to their karate class with his car... That interests me as much as garlic skin."

"I couldn't care less" doesn't have the same zing, the same tone of dismissal and mild contempt. "What do I care?" comes close, but lacks color. "Thank you for sharing" with an almost-concealed sneer works in direct speech.

Do you see what I mean? What can I say in English outside of a direct-speech situation?

Thanks!
 
  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    hmmm I can't think of a polite one: "not give a rat's a*s", "not give a hoot" "not give a/two straw(s)", "not give the time of the day" is all I can come up with.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    "You have my utmost sympathy-- that and a dime will buy you a cup of coffee."

    What, a cup of coffee costs how much nowadays?
    .
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Thanks, all.

    Since I'm not dealing with a direct response to the unfortunate contractor, but rather dialogue reporting:

    a) what the contractor said, and
    b) what the speaker thought about it,

    I suppose I'll use something like, "...take the children to karate class with his car... Like I care!"

    Question: Is that colloquial American? I'm losing my ear. :(

    (Context: As a nice change from my usual fare, I'm translating a radio-play adaptation of a novel.)

    If anyone comes up with something more colorful that doesn't require asterisks to spell it ;), I'll be very grateful.
     

    DavyBCN

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    Nun-Translator said:
    Thanks, all.

    Since I'm not dealing with a direct response to the unfortunate contractor, but rather dialogue reporting:

    a) what the contractor said, and
    b) what the speaker thought about it,

    I suppose I'll use something like, "...take the children to karate class with his car... Like I care!"

    Question: Is that colloquial American? I'm losing my ear. :(

    (Context: As a nice change from my usual fare, I'm translating a radio-play adaptation of a novel.)

    If anyone comes up with something more colorful that doesn't require asterisks to spell it ;), I'll be very grateful.
    "Like I care" is orginally American English but increasingly heard in British English - especially young people. "Whatever!" is also very popular now as a very dismissive word - and very irritating!:mad:
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I like the modern youthism - "I think you're confusing me with someone who cares" - but would have gotten a clip on the ear, or much lower down, had I ever used it with my mother!
     
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