As, like - He ran away from his family <as, like> a bird from a cage.

azz

Senior Member
armenian
a. He ran away from his family as a bird flies away from a cage.
b. He ran away from his family as a bird does from a cage.
c. He ran away from his family like a bird from a cage.
d. He ran away from his family as a bird from a cage.

Are these sentences grammatical?
 
  • azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Hi Languageguy,

    Isn't a verb missing in d?
    I think you can't say:

    e. He ran away from his family as a bird. (I think it should be "as a bird does")

    so logically you can't be able to say:

    d. He ran away from his family as a bird from a cage.

    (To me it sounds like he ran away after having transformed himself into a bird from a cage.)

    I might be completely wrong though.
     

    marianna713

    New Member
    United States, English
    Hello,

    It is my understanding that one uses "like" to introduce a prepositional phrase (doesn't have a verb), and one uses "as" to introduce a clause (has a verb). I agree that example d is incorrect, it requires a verb.

    Marianna
     
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