as long as she has some cheesecake and coffee at hand, ...

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8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
I’m trying to put a sentence in Japanese, in isolation, into English. I have made four versions as follows.
As long as she has ( ), my sister will be very happy.
1. cheesecake and coffee
2. cheesecake and coffee at hand
3. some cheese cheesecake and coffee
4. some cheese cheesecake and coffee at hand
I thought #2 was best at first, but later I began to wonder if #4 might be better.
What do you think?
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Other than the doubling of "cheese" in 3 and 4, I think they are all fine and the choice is simply a matter of personal preference. It has more to do with the rhythm of the sentence in relation to others, in my opinion.

    As a side note, it would be very common in spoken American English to say, "she's very happy" instead of placing it in the future ("she will be very happy.")

    "As long as I have coffee, I'm happy."

    (So true, so true....)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If cheese cake and coffee are items that she customarily has at that time of day, then I'd add a "her" to make it more colloquial (New York, USA).

    As long as she has her cheese cake and coffee, my sister will be very happy.
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you all for your replies.

    The addition of "at hand" changes the meaning of the sentence. The correct choice would depend to a great extent on which of the ideas you were trying to express.
    I'm trying to express:
    If she is under the condition where cheesecake and coffee is near her and ready for her to eat, my sister will be very happy.

    The verb "have" in all the four versions I gave in my first posting is not intended to mean "eat."
     
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