As much a part of this country as Mom and apple pie

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joh2001smile

Senior Member
Chinese
This is from a book named Winning Decisions: Getting It Right the First Time by J. Edward Russo, Paul J.H. Schoemaker.
This is comment about Coca-Cola's bottles.
Does it mean much of this part of the country loves Mom and apple pie?
Context:
“The bottle design nearly became the product itself,” Sculley recalls. “It made Coke easier to stack, more comfortable to grip, and more sturdy to withstand a vending machine’s drop. As much a part of this country as Mom and apple pie, it was the only company logo a person could pick up in his hand.”
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "As American as apple pie" and "Mom and apple pie" are well-known expressions used in connection with America.

    From Wikipedia: Apple pie:
    Although apple pies have been eaten since long before the European colonisation of the Americas, "as American as apple pie" is a saying in the United States, meaning "typically American". In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, apple pie became a symbol of American prosperity and national pride. A newspaper article published in 1902 declared that “No pie-eating people can be permanently vanquished.” The dish was also commemorated in the phrase "for Mom and apple pie" - supposedly the stock answer of American soldiers in World War II, whenever journalists asked why they were going to war.

    And from Wiktionary: Mom and apple pie:
    1. (US, symbolically) Wholesomeness and American traditional values
    2. (politics, US) Something that can't be questioned because it appeals to universally-held beliefs or values.
     
    Last edited:

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    Does it mean much of this part of the country loves Mom and apple pie?

    No, it means that the Coke bottle has become as iconically American as mom and apple pie.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Don't imagine that only Americans eat apple pie - it was first imported from Britain and doubtless invented by the Romans. But for some reason it has never been though of as particularly British. And not only Americans have mothers!

    But the phrase "motherhood and apple pie" was invented to mean "the safe, heartwarming values which nobody can object to". Why should that be particularly American? I think that some over-patriotic slippage of meaning has probably occurred over the years.
     

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's just a common saying. You don't have to agree with it.

    And while you might have mothers, the phrase is "Mom and apple pie" -- and you guys tend to have "mums", not "moms", right?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    And yes, mom/Mom is as American as apple pie:D
    Now, I'm wondering whether the reference is to concept of mom-ness or to the word mom. ;) The word is also not exclusively American. Mom is used around the Midlands and Birmingham (UK, that is) in general. See for example here:
    We in Birmingham and the West Midlands get annoyed when people wrongly think we are using American words, when the word Mom and Mommy aren't American they were British to start with, it's just unlike the West Midlands other areas changed their spelling.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Dissenters on both sides! From that interesting link:

    I'm from the American South and many of us still call our mothers "Mama" or "Mother" (I say both) and many black people do this as well. Many people around here have never said "Mom" in their whole life. It annoys me that most people just assume all Americans do this.
    Now I suspect we will have "As West Midlands as Mom and apple crumble:eek:"
     
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