As of....

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TerryWang

Senior Member
Taiwan
I have a problem with the definitions of "as of". It seems to have two definitions "since" and "until", but I can't determine which definition to apply, as in "Valid as of". Sometimes it is really ambiguous to me: The ticket is valid as of January 1 = starting or until January 1? Is there an easy way to make a differentiation? Thanks a lot.:D
 
  • Carrie2

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Starting January 1. I've never heard "as of" meaning "until", and it definitely doesn't have that meaning in Britain, where I'm from. So perhaps that makes your life simpler, Terry! :)
     

    TerryWang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan
    Thank you. I looked it up in the online dictionary, which says it is used to indicate a time or date at which something begins or ends. But there is only one point I can't get. Why does it says "something begins or ends"?:p
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Well, it can be used to indicate the first date of the closure of something.

    "As of November 1st, 2006, the Flower Street station will be closed for maintenance."

    I can't think of any other way to make it indicate the ending of something, though.
     

    Gordonedi

    Senior Member
    UK (Scotland) English
    A couple of examples may help :

    The price of apples increased by 10% as of 08:00 this morning. (= start)

    Your authority to drive a car at 120 miles per hour on the motorway was withdrawn as of 08:00 this morning. (= end)
     

    bmo

    Senior Member
    Taiwan
    As of January 1, the store will be closed. The store will not be open on January 1, right?

    (This is the beginning.)

    As of December 31, we had made $30,000 profit.
    Ending on and including the day December 31.

    (This is the ending.)

    Am I correct in both examples?

    Thanks.
     

    TerryWang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan
    Thanks for your example. And one more question. Which is more applicable to "As of now, he is the richest"?
    1. From now on, he is the richest.
    2 Until now, he is the richest.
    :)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Thanks for your example. And one more question. Which is more applicable to "As of now, he is the richest"?
    1. From now on, he is the richest.
    2 Until now, he is the richest.
    :)
    Actually, in this case I would say it means "at this point in time." To me, it implies that he is now the richest and will continue to be until someone surpasses him. So, although it refers to the future, it doesn't mean "from now on."
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I have a problem with the definitions of "as of". It seems to have two definitions "since" and "until", but I can't determine which definition to apply, as in "Valid as of". Sometimes it is really ambiguous to me: The ticket is valid as of January 1 = starting or until January 1? Is there an easy way to make a differentiation? Thanks a lot.:D
    Because I come from a legal background (and lawyers are definitely choosy about which words they use!), I would always say the following in the context of your sentence:

    The ticket is valid as at January 1", meaning it only becomes valid at that time.
     

    eddiemel7778

    Senior Member
    Portuguese/Brazil
    Hi, guys! I understand what you guys mean, but I have already heard "as of yesterday, the staff hadn't been informed of the new schedule?"
    Is this statement correct? If so, does it mean until? And if it means "starting at that point in time up to now" Wouldn't it be better to say " as of yesterday, the staff hasn't beeninformed of the new schedule"?
    Thanks heaps!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hi, guys! I understand what you guys mean, but I have already heard "as of yesterday, the staff hadn't been informed of the new schedule?"
    Is this statement correct? If so, does it mean until? And if it means "starting at that point in time up to now" Wouldn't it be better to say " as of yesterday, the staff hasn't beeninformed of the new schedule"?
    Thanks heaps!
    I would presume the staff had been informed sometime between yesterday and today, so I would go with "hadn't."

    For example:

    "Finally, everyone is showing up at the correct time this morning. Why didn't they show up at this time all week, Jensen?"

    "Well, sir, as of yesterday, the staff (still) hadn't been informed of the new schedule. Now that they are aware of it, they are complying."

    I would tend to use "the staff hadn't been informed of the new schedule until yesterday" instead of "as of yesterday blah-blah-blah" I agree with you that it's a bit confusing.

    If you are fixing a point in time, though, "as of yesterday" is very handy.

    "What is the projected storm track for this hurricane, Bob?"

    "Well, our network center has been down all night due to storm damage, so I have no up-to-date information, Steve. As of yesterday at 6 p.m., however, the storm was projected to make landfall near Port Royal around 3 p.m. today."
     
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