as opposed to just elements

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fadeout32811!!!

Senior Member
french
Hi,

I am watching "The Great British Bake off" and there is a line that I don't understand.
In a challenge, they have to make a trifle.
And one of the participants says,

"At some stage during The Great British Bake Off,
I might actually do a whole thing that is good, as opposed to just elements."

I don't understand the meaning of the line at all.
Would someone explain please?

Thank you!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Presumably in this case it means they might manage to get the whole of an elaborate cake right, instead of just a few of the individual elements it consists of (basic cake mixture, filling, icing, decoration, whatever).
     
    Presumably in this case it means they might manage to get the whole of an elaborate cake right, instead of just a few of the individual elements it consists of (basic cake mixture, filling, icing, decoration, whatever):thumbsup:.
    I agree.:thumbsup: You could end up with a great cake, but a disappointing custard, or the reverse, etc. A trifle is, after all, a layered dessert made from different previously-prepared things. If even one thing isn't up to par, the quality of the whole trifle will suffer somewhat.

    It sounds to me as though the participant might have entered the contest before but had had points taken off for something, and is hoping that won't happen again.:rolleyes:
     
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