... as reasonable, if not more reasonable, as those at discount stores.

diogerepus

Senior Member
Korean
In a grammar book,

The prices at chain stores are as reasonable, if not more reasonable, as those at discount stores.

The book says the latter 'as' should be 'than' because comparative 'more reasonable' is usually followed by 'than'.
But I think 'if not more reasonable' is an insertion and 'as reasonable' should be followed by 'as' instead of 'than'.
Isn't this phrase being used like as adjective as?

What am I missing here?
 
  • Eddie

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi, Dio.

    I understand your dilemma. Normally, as ... as is the usual structure. But the sentence you are dealing with also contains the word more, and more is always followed by than.
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I kind of agree with both of you, but the best way around this kind of dilemma is to split the sentence at a different point: "The prices at chain stores are as reasonable as, if not more reasonable than, those at discount stores." Simple, no?
     

    Eddie

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Bravo, Garry!

    The proper punctuation is the PERFECT solution to this problem. I should have seen that. It proves how much we can learn from each other.
     
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