As rich as you/Money grow tree

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,


One of my friends often asks me to go to some fancy restaurants with him. Last time when he did, I said:


I’m not as rich as you!


I want to show him my anger, contempt. But I know the expression doesn’t work very well, even though with the exclamation tone. And I can think of one might be better:


My money doesn’t grow on the tree. (This can better expresses my contempt because it tells him that I don't have enough money for fancy restaurant and also intimates what he's doing.)

But, is that a bit old-fashioned?

Thoughts:

The above is what I can think of right now.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Silver. Your reply is certainly clear, but I don't think that the words really express anger or contempt by themselves. They merely tell me that you are not as wealthy as he is. If you scowled or raised your voice, you might have communicated your anger as you spoke those words.

    "My money doesn't grow on trees" does imply that money is precious and scarce to you. I suppose you could use this version if you wanted to let that guy know that you don't have money to waste on expensive restaurants.

    Why did his question anger you? Were you embarrassed that you didn't have the money to do what he suggested? If he had asked me that question, I really don't think I would have felt and anger or contempt for him because he did so.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I want to show him my anger, contempt. But I know the expression doesn’t work very well, even though with the exclamation tone. And I can think of one might be better:
    My money doesn’t grow on the tree. (This can better expresses my contempt because it tells him that I don't have enough money for fancy restaurant and also intimates what he's doing.)
    The expression is "Money doesn't grow on trees." If you say "My money doesn't grow on a tree," it sounds like you're implying that his does!

    You call this person a "friend" yet say you want to show him your anger and contempt. It sounds to me like you may be angry because you can't afford the fancy restaurants that he can and he doesn't seem to understand this or is perhaps rubbing it in by continuing to suggest you go there.

    If he really is a friend and he asks you again, I would personally suggest saying the following with a smile:
    (-Would you like to go to X?)
    -Are you treating?

    ("Treating" means "paying.")
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi, Silver. Your reply is certainly clear, but I don't think that the words really express anger or contempt by themselves. They merely tell me that you are not as wealthy as he is. If you scowled or raised your voice, you might have communicated your anger as you spoke those words.

    Thanks a lot. I got it!

    "My money doesn't grow on trees" does imply that money is precious and scarce to you. I suppose you could use this version if you wanted to let that guy know that you don't have money to waste on expensive restaurants.

    Why did his question anger you? Were you embarrassed that you didn't have the money to do what he suggested? If he had asked me that question, I really don't think I would have felt and anger or contempt for him because he did so.

    He often asks me to go to the restaurants with him and I've refused him since the first time he did so. I think he should know and learn how to save money when he's better off.
    The expression is "Money doesn't grow on trees." If you say "My money doesn't grow on a tree," it sounds like you're implying that his does!

    You call this person a "friend" yet say you want to show him your anger and contempt. It sounds to me like you may be angry because you can't afford the fancy restaurants that he can and he doesn't seem to understand this or is perhaps rubbing it in by continuing to suggest you go there.

    If he really is a friend and he asks you again, I would personally suggest saying the following with a smile:
    (-Would you like to go to X?)
    -Are you treating?

    ("Treating" means "paying.")

    Thanks a lot, LH.
     

    slej

    Senior Member
    Ireland / England English
    You could say ' I don't have money to burn'. Although it doesn't show contempt for his wealth, it quickly rules out going to a fancy restaurant.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The expression is "Money doesn't grow on trees." If you say "My money doesn't grow on a tree," it sounds like you're implying that his does!

    You call this person a "friend" yet say you want to show him your anger and contempt. It sounds to me like you may be angry because you can't afford the fancy restaurants that he can and he doesn't seem to understand this or is perhaps rubbing it in by continuing to suggest you go there.

    If he really is a friend and he asks you again, I would personally suggest saying the following with a smile:
    (-Would you like to go to X?)
    -Are you treating?

    ("Treating" means "paying.")
    Is it appropriate to change the set expression into:

    My money didn't grow on the trees?
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Is it appropriate to change the set expression into:

    My money didn't grow on the trees?
    No.
    By definition, a set expression is one that is fixed and does not change.

    Here is an example of its use from the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary:
    Money doesn't grow on trees.
    something that you say which means you should be careful how much money you spend because there is only a limited amount 'Dad, can I have a new bike?' 'We can't afford one. Money doesn't grow on trees, you know.'
     

    Winstanley808

    Banned
    English - U.S.
    I think one could use a variant of the "fixed expression" "Money doesn't grow on trees." But it would have to be "My money didn't grow on trees," not "My money didn't grow on the trees," since there aren't any specific money trees to refer to. It could also be in the present tense. It would be a way of emphasizing that I had [have] to work for my money, I couldn't [can't] just pluck it off trees with no other effort.

    Making variations on fixed expressions is an advanced technique, and requires a full understanding of the expressions involved, so it has to be done carefully by learners. (Or, more accurately, carefully by native speakers and even more carefully by learners.)
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I think one could use a variant of the "fixed expression" "Money doesn't grow on trees." But it would have to be "My money didn't grow on trees," not "My money didn't grow on the trees," since there aren't any specific money trees to refer to. It could also be in the present tense. It would be a way of emphasizing that I had [have] to work for my money, I couldn't [can't] just pluck it off trees with no other effort.

    Making variations on fixed expressions is an advanced technique, and requires a full understanding of the expressions involved, so it has to be done carefully by learners. (Or, more accurately, carefully by native speakers and even more carefully by learners.)
    Thanks for you explanation.
     
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