as... so also

sakya kim

Senior Member
myanmar
But, as there is nothing that persists from one moment of consciousness to the next, so also no abiding element exists in this ever changing life-process that can pass over from one life to another.

in this sentence, wht does the word ''as'' mean? may it mean as ''simile'' or ''reason''?
following of the phrase ''so also'' makes me so confused.

Explain me, please...

source:

"Collected Wheel Publications Volume XXVI: Numbers 394411 - Various Authors, Nyanatiloka Thera, Robert Bogoda, Roger Bischoff, A. G. S. Kariyawasam, Bhikkhu Bodhi, Lily de Silva - Google Books" Collected Wheel Publications Volume XXVI
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The comparative construction being used in that sentence is:
    as A, so also B

    Another version of that is:
    just as [clause A], so too [clause B]

    meaning:
    in the same way that A is true, B is also true
    in the same way as A happens, similarly B happens
     

    sakya kim

    Senior Member
    myanmar
    The comparative construction being used in that sentence is:
    as A, so also B

    Another version of that is:
    just as [clause A], so too [clause B]

    meaning:
    in the same way that A is true, B is also true
    in the same way as A happens, similarly B happens
    Thanks...

    in the following sentence, does the structure ''if..., so also'' mean the same as this structure ''as..., so also''?

    ''If every physical state is preceded by another state as its cause,
    so also must this present physico-mental life be dependent upon causes anterior to its birth.''
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not quite. Here what’s being said is if A is true, then it follows that B must also be true – implying cause and effect, rather than saying that two things work or happen in the same way.
     

    sakya kim

    Senior Member
    myanmar
    Not quite. Here what’s being said is if A is true, then it follows that B must also be true – implying cause and effect, rather than saying that two things work or happen in the same way.
    Thanks for your helpful answer...
     

    sakya kim

    Senior Member
    myanmar
    Not quite. Here what’s being said is if A is true, then it follows that B must also be true – implying cause and effect, rather than saying that two things work or happen in the same way.
    Please, let me know your wise suggestions, and get your help.
    I have a difficult passage:

    ''And the rising and falling is produced by the transmission of force originally generated by wind. Just so the Buddha did not teach that it is an ego-entity, or a soul, that hastens through the ocean of rebirth, but that it is in reality merely a life-wave which, according to its nature and activities, appears here as man, there as animal, and elsewhere as invisible being.''

    in this sentences, second sentence make me so confused, especially the phrase ''just so'' and the clause ''that hastens through the ocean of rebirth.''

    Does this phrase ''just so'' denote its sentence to compare with above words of sentence (by unlikely manner) ?

    And can the verb ''hasten'' have
    imperative meaning here?

    "Collected Wheel Publications Volume XXVI: Numbers 394411 - Various Authors, Nyanatiloka Thera, Robert Bogoda, Roger Bischoff, A. G. S. Kariyawasam, Bhikkhu Bodhi, Lily de Silva - Google Books" Collected Wheel Publications Volume XXVI
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree that’s a more normal way to say it in current colloquial use – but the text in question (Fundamentals of Buddhism: Four Lectures) is from the (translated?) transcript of a radio lecture on the Essence of Buddhism given in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in 1933 by a German-born Buddhist monk born in 1878! :)
     
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