As soon as I have received?

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nebt

Senior Member
Czech, CZ
Dear all,

I have got a question:

I will let you know as soon as I have talked to him.

Correct or not? Possibly, it could be only present simple (i. e. I´ll let you know as soon as I talk to him). But I just feel the first version to be more convenient...

Brief response is enough. Thank you a lot.
 
  • judkinsc

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's fine.

    Contract it to make it sound better.

    "I've got..." or just "I have a question [for you]."
    "I'll let...I've..."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Welcome to WordReference, nebt.

    Both are correct, but I support your preference for the first version, "... as soon as I have talked ..."

    We can't guarantee to provide such rapid responses every time - but it happens often:)
     

    judkinsc

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Brackets mean something added that was not in the original. I meant that you can use "for you" in that sentence. "I have" and "I have got" are variants between AE and BE.
     

    nebt

    Senior Member
    Czech, CZ
    And the "brackets" stand for your (American) "parentheses" here. I´ve got it. English can be puzzling...
     

    Uncopyrightable

    New Member
    Jordan - Arabic
    Well!
    As an interpreter/translator [Arabic<>English];
    I understand that:
    1- "I will let you know as soon as I have talked to Mary." means:
    I will let you know after having finished talking to Mary; i.e. when talking to Mary is over.

    WHILE:

    2- "I will let you know as soon as I talk to Mary." means:
    I will let you know at any point starting from the moment of talking to Mary; whether or not having finished talking to her.

    THANX
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Uncopyrightable said:
    Well!
    As an interpreter/translator [Arabic<>English];
    I understand that:
    1- "I will let you know as soon as I have talked to Mary." means:
    I will let you know after having finished talking to Mary; i.e. when talking to Mary is over.

    WHILE:

    2- "I will let you know as soon as I talk to Mary." means:
    I will let you know at any point starting from the moment of talking to Mary; whether or not having finished talking to her.

    THANX
    Hello, Uncopyrightable, and welcome to the forums. :)

    Your explanation of #1 is correct; however, I do not agree with #2. "I will let you know as soon as I talk to Mary" also implies that at least the segment of talking after which I will let you know has been completed. Similarly, sentence #1 refers only to that segment; it says nothing about whether I will proceed to talk to Mary later about something else. I think the meaning is the same, but the present perfect sounds more elegant.

    Also, as an interpreter you probably know that "thanks" has no "x." ;) Thanks for avoiding chatboard abbreviations so as to aid learners of English.

    Once again, welcome.
     
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