as the girl said to the soldier

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mohsen.amiri

Senior Member
persian
Hi
In a dialogue between two person, one of them says 'as the girl said to the soldier' which does not seem to be related to whole their talks. Is it an idiom, proverb or something else which implies to a special concept? The dialogue is in below book When Hitchcock says: 'Now come right over here, Miss Ondra, and stand still in your place, or it won't come out right - as the girl said to the soldier.'
Book: Dark Side of Genius by Donald Spoto P. 118.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The usual form of this is 'as the actress said to the bishop'. It's added as a joke after something that could have a smutty second meaning.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I am not familiar with this pairing, but it is like the set phrase "as the actress said to the bishop" which we can say after a double-entendre.

    If you really try you can make the words "stand still in your place or it wont come out right" sound suggestive of a sexual encounter, I suppose!
     

    mohsen.amiri

    Senior Member
    persian
    Suzi br
    What does 'stand still in ....' mean exactly? What does it refer to? Please explain more about it's usage.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it seems to be a variation of the British "actress/barmaid & vicar" type of expression, used as a joke cover up when making an inadvertent (accidental) double-entendre (French), words with a double, sexual, meaning.
    " 'That's a big one!', as the actress said to the archbishop."

    (Also used for deliberate effect and feeble amusement: it's such a pathetic cliche)
    Said the actress to the bishop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The phrase is frequently used by the fictional character Simon Templar (alias "The Saint") in a long-running series of mystery books by Leslie Charteris. The phrase first appears in the inaugural Saint novel Meet the Tiger, published in 1928.[1] The version "as the girl said to the soldier" appears in a recorded sound test for Alfred Hitchcock's 1929 film Blackmail.[5]
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    In the actual context it is a director's instruction to an actress to stay in her place.

    He has said it and then realises that it might have a sexual meaning ... though maybe that depends on a view of sex where women / men have to keep still in their place! Which to be honest is quite funny in itself :D
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    When Hitchcock says: 'Now come right over here, Miss Ondra, and stand still in your place, or it won't come out right - as the girl said to the soldier.'
    I have no idea precisely what the 'double-entendre' is here, but that's a large part of the point. What Hitchcock said is somehow very vaguely suggestive, impossible to explain exactly why. Maybe there is none at all, but the comparison makes one think there should be and one is somehow not very clever if one doesn't find a 'dirty'/suggestive meaning.

    The more I think about it, the more sadly juvenile it seems.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I have no idea precisely what the 'double-entendre' is here, but that's a large part of the point. What Hitchcock said is somehow very vaguely suggestive, impossible to explain exactly why. Maybe there is none at all, but the comparison makes one think there should be and one is somehow not very clever if one doesn't find a 'dirty'/suggestive meaning.

    The more I think about it, the more sadly juvenile it seems.
    Hitchcock was a (sexual) bully with some of his female stars, apparently, so this would fit. Suggesting that there are innuendos where there really are none?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    :D
    But I'm not laughing about Hitchcock being by all accounts some sort of monster.

    Suggesting that there are innuendos where there really are none?
    .
    I can't help thinking of such incredibly outdated innuendo in my own lifetime, which has seen the scandalously unmentionable go to everyday dinner party conversation, words that were unutterable even if one knew them, becoming completely acceptable.
    All this 'tart to archbishop' stuff' seems almost charmingly ante-diluvian.

    I'm looking forward very much to US comments. I hadn't heard of Donald Spoto.
     
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