As The mad Friar-bitten Wandering Bigot

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Lark-lover

Senior Member
Arabic
As The mad Friar-bitten Wandering Bigot <-----Topic added to post by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Hi, folks

What does it mean?

Does it mean that the bigot who had already been scolded/blamed by the friar, is now mad and roaming over?

Cannot get it !

Context source

Essay on the Archaeology of Our Popular Phrases
 
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  • Lark-lover

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Please give us the complete sentence, Lark-lover, and provide some context in the thread.
    Thanks a lot, Florentia52


    A Pilgrim

    As the mad Friar-bitten wandering bigot; seems, er pijle Grim; q.e.there is the Grim One's scholar; that is one getting the task set by the Grim-One…
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Well, Lark-lover, 'the mad Friar-bitten wandering bigot' is simply the author's definition of a 'Pilgrim', for which he goes on to give some specious justification in his alleged etymology . The source book you kindly direct us to is perhaps the craziest work of scholarship I have ever come across, and you will know that it is motivated in part by an insane hatred of Catholicism and all its works. A 'Pilgrim' is a 'bigot' simply because of his association with the Catholic church ; he is a 'wandering' bigot , because that's what pilgrims do - they travel often very long distances , motivated by their faith (or bigotry) ; 'Friar-bitten' is explained in the pseudo-etymology which follows : Pilgrim= someone performing a task imposed by the Grim One, the Grim One being a Friar (or the Devil), because that's how Saxons would have pictured him (!), and the journey of the pilgrim being seen as a task imposed as penance by a Friar. The 'mad Friar-bitten' metaphor suggests being bitten and infected (and sent mad) by some poisonous creature or rabid dog (= the Friar).
     
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    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Well, Lark-lover, 'the mad Friar-bitten wandering bigot' is simply the author's definition of a 'Pilgrim', for which he goes on to give some specious justification in his alleged etymology . The source book you kindly direct us to is perhaps the craziest work of scholarship I have ever come across, and you will know that it is motivated in part by an insane hatred of Catholicism and all its works.
    Thanks for that explanation. I can read a bit of Dutch but I was completely mystified as to what he was talking about. A strange little book!
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    The source book you kindly direct us to is perhaps the craziest work of scholarship I have ever come across
    I agree. Between the absurd Dutch "etymologies" and the virulent anti-Catholicism the book comes across almost as a big joke, but then you realize that the author was serious.
     
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