As time getting closer to ; As time nearing to

Egoexpress

Senior Member
Hungary, Hungarian
Hello,

As time getting closer to the exam, I feel more and more nervous.

As time nearing to the exam, I feel more and more nervous.

I suspect the first would be idomatic, would you clarify that?
How could I use "near" in such a context?

Thank you!
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Neither sentence is grammatically correct. The first sentence would correctly be:

    "As time gets closer to the exam, I feel more and more nervous."

    The second sentence would correctly be:

    "As time nears the exam, I feel more and more nervous."

    Another way to use "near" would be:

    "As the time for the exam nears, I feel more and more nervous".
     

    Egoexpress

    Senior Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    What if I said
    "As time is getting closer to the exam, I feel more and more nervous."
    or
    "As the time for the exam is nearing, I feel more and more nervous."

    Do they convey the same meaning?
     

    vdawg

    Member
    Hindustani, U.S. English
    Time getting closer or nearer, does not sound very native.
    In America, we would say,

    As it gets closer to exam time, I feel more and more nervous.

    or

    As the exam gets closer, I feel more and more nervous.

    (gets also sounds more natural than nears)

    I hope that helps!
     

    Egoexpress

    Senior Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    It does, but I don't feel the difference. If one of my students asked me about this I could not give him a clear answer.

    Let's take "I'm getting hungry." - I'm not hungry yet, but I'm in the middle of the process of being hungry.

    "As time (is) get(ting) closer to the exam, I feel more and more nervous." - The time has not come yet, has it?

    I'd like you to help me feeling the difference.

    Thank you very much!
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I don't have a ready explanation of all this, but let me try to outline a rough idea of what these constructions mean:

    1. "As exam time is approaching, I am feeling more and more nervous."
    2. "As exam time approaches, I feel more and more nervous."
    3. "As exam time is approaching, I feel more and more nervous."
    4. "Exam time approaching, I feel more and more nervous."

    Sentence 1 is reporting things at the moment they are happening. Sentence 2 is reporting a series of happenings, in the recent past and presumably ongoing, or something that continually happens.

    Sentence 3 is mixed. The exam approaching is being reported as it happens, but the feeling is less clear as to timing. I feel more likely to interpret "as" as "because" or "since" rather than as "during the time that" in sentence 3.

    The meaning of sentence 4 is close to that of sentence 1 or 2, but with more emphasis on what exam time is doing and less on the timing of it.
     
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