as to vs about

ullas84

Senior Member
turkish
''As to '' is defined as in the same meaning with ''About''

All WH- quesitons I seen , are used with ''As to''.

İs it more idiomatic to use ''AS to'' with WH- questions than ''About''

EG;

A1)He was uncertain as to which roadto take.

B1)There's no decision as to when the work might start.

A2)He was uncertain about which road to take.

B2)There's no decision about when the work might start.

Are both sentences correct A1 vs A2 and B1 vs B2?

Which is prefered by a native ; as to +wh- question or about+ wh-question ??
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, all the sentences are fine and, for me, neither one is preferable to the other. I would say both of them.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They’re both fine, but “as to” is probably less common in spoken rather than written English. In A, neither as to nor about is even needed, by the way: He was uncertain which road to take. :thumbsup:
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    For the phrase ''as to whether '' , are ''about'' and ''as to'' still interchangeable?

    For example

    Sentence 1

    There is some doubt as to whether the information is totally accurate

    Sentence 2 )

    There is some doubt about whether the information is totally accurate.

    is it possible to make sentence 1 in the way as sentence 2?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In A, neither as to nor about is even needed,
    Because of this, it really does not matter which you use - they are both mere emphatics that signal the introduction of the following noun phrase.

    There is some doubt as to whether the information is totally accurate
    There is some doubt whether the information is totally accurate
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    There are no "rules" in English.
    they are both mere emphatics that signal the introduction of the following noun phrase.
    As to is a short form of "as to the question of" - this can be omitted when the following phrase or clause starts with a "wh-" word, i.e. is an indirect question.

    About, as a preposition, cannot be omitted as it is used to combine with a noun to form a modifier.
    "Tell me {about your holiday.}"
    "What do you know {about the war} in Ruritania?"
     
    Last edited:

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    There are no "rules" in English.
    As to is a short form of "as to the question of" - this can be omitted when the following phrase or clause starts with a "wh-" word, i.e. is an indirect question.

    About, as a preposition, cannot be omitted as it is used to combine with a noun to form a modifier.
    "Tell me {about your holiday.}"
    "What do you know {about the war} in Ruritania?"
    Do you think that I can omit ''as to '' in the following sentence?

    B2)There's no decision as to when the work might start.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Do you think that I can omit ''as to '' in the following sentence?

    B2)There's no decision as to when the work might start.
    Hmm..[... as to..].....[when the work might start] is a modifier (a defining noun clause), and is required.
    .........preposition.................noun clause.

    So it cannot be omitted.

    Compare
    B2)There's no decision on/about when the work might start.
     
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