'as' vs. 'which': likely to lose all credibility, as is an advocate ....

Julianus

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.

1. a. For example, a mediator who ‘takes sides’ is likely to lose all credibility, as is an advocate who seeks to adopt a neutral position. (Korean university entrance exam)

Question : I think that 'as' indicactes 'likely to lose all credibility' and 'as' can be replaced with 'which'. Am I right?


Thank you always~.
 
  • Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    No. As is means here in the same way as. It means that an advocate who seeks to adopt a neutral position is likely to lose all credibility, in the same way as a mediator who takes sides.

    An advocate is expected to advocate; if he doesn't he loses credibility. A mediator is supposed to remain impartial; if he takes sides, he loses credibility.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Replacing "as" with "which" would be wrong, Jullianus. "As" here tells the reader that an advocate who seeks to adopt a neutral position would also lose all credibility. If you used "which" here, you would be saying that the mediator and the advocate are the same person. That doesn't make any sense.
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    As is is an expression which compares two things.

    Caviar is expensive, as is lobster. (Both caviar and lobster are expensive.)
    I'm new here, as are you. (We are both new here.)
     
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