as welcoming of something

emre aydın

Senior Member
Turkish
A man is appointed to a record company as managing director and says to a singer of the company who's been trying to change her music style recently:

"You guys have been very welcoming to me. Unfortunately, it seems the public hasn't been as welcoming of your latest effort. Your single hasn't
made it to number one. The tweens are not showing up on this one."

(from the TV series Nashville)

What is the function of "as" in the bold part? Maybe it should have been excluded from that part, what do you say? Thanks for your help.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It is the comparative "as" = "to the same extent":

    You guys have been very welcoming to me. Unfortunately, it seems the public hasn't been as welcoming of your latest effort.
     

    emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    It is the comparative "as" = "to the same extent":

    You guys have been very welcoming to me. Unfortunately, it seems the public hasn't been as welcoming of your latest effort.
    PaulQ, so you mean you could briefly say "as", instead of "as welcoming as", right?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The full sentence, without any ellipsis would be:

    You guys have been very welcoming to me. Unfortunately, it seems the public hasn't been as welcoming of your latest effort as you were when you welcomed me.
     
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