as well / also / too

arnold_84

Member
Italy - Sardinia - Italiano!!!
Hello everybody,

I know “as well” means “anche”, as a matter of fact, “also” and “too” mean the same, is it possible to exchange them in every way and situations?
... I lay on... could I say “As well me” meaning “Anche io”?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • Londoner06

    Senior Member
    US/English, Spanish
    Arnold,

    In English it would be "me as well", me coming before anche (as well, too, also) so, "me too", "me also", ecc. I find "me too" more commonly used than "me as well", I do hear "for me as well" if for example you're ordering the same thing as your friend in a restaurant, for example.

    Ciao,

    Alex
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Often they can be used interchangeably:

    - I saw that movie.
    - I did, too. or I did as well. or I did, also. or So did I.

    Sometimes the placement varies:

    - Mary also saw the movie. but
    - Mary saw the movie as well. and
    - Mary saw the movie, too.

    Elisabetta
     

    arnold_84

    Member
    Italy - Sardinia - Italiano!!!
    Ok... very clear... my doubt was if I could exchange the two ones in every situation... after your answer I suppose YES. I thought "as well" was used for detailed constructions only... might I say "as well" is a little bit more formal... or I'm mistaken?

    CIAO
     

    Londoner06

    Senior Member
    US/English, Spanish
    Ok... very clear... my doubt was if I could exchange the two ones in every situation... after your answer I suppose YES. I thought "as well" was used for detailed constructions only... might I say "as well" is a little bit more formal... or I'm mistaken?

    CIAO
    As Elisabetta pointed out, yes, they are pretty interchangeable. I think maybe the Brits tend to use "as well" more often than Americans.:)

    Alex
     

    kaineggs

    Member
    Italy, Italian
    Hello,
    My question is very simple.
    Is "as well" as "also"?
    Is there a particular movitation to choose "as well"?

    In this statement:

    "We can sometimes leave out the subject as well."

    Could I write it in another way?
    For example: "We can sometimes leave out also the subject"
    or "We can sometimes leave out the subject too"

    Thanks,
    Dario
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    "As well", "also" and "too" have the same meaning - "anche". The difference is their position in the sentence.

    We can sometimes leave out the subject as well.

    We can sometimes leave out the subject too.

    We can also sometimes leave out the subject.

    Using "as well" can give a little more emphasis to the word "anche".
     

    kaineggs

    Member
    Italy, Italian
    Maybe the rule is:

    As well and too go to the end of a sentence (a clause)
    As well is more formal the others.
    Also comes after the verb.

    Is it right?
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Maybe the rule is:

    As well and too go to the end of a sentence (a clause):tick:
    As well is more formal than the others. I don't think it is any more or any less formal than the others
    Also comes after the verb. It comes after the subject but before the verb, unless the verb is an auxiliary or modal verb, and then "also" comes after the verb. The verb in the sentence you used as example is "can" - a modal verb.

    Is it right?
    :)
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    As well as at sentence/clause endings, "as well" may be found at the beginning. :)
     

    Londoner06

    Senior Member
    US/English, Spanish
    Dario,

    I find "as well" is very often used in BE for "also":

    I'll have a glass of Chianti, said William. I'll have one as well, said Harry.

    Alex
     

    irene.acler

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Hi!

    I have another question about this topic.
    Is "as well" formal or informal? And "also" and "too"?
    A teacher of mine told me it's not appropriate in formal texts.

    In particular, I wrote this sentence:
    They supported their ideas with an impressive number of statistics that demonstrates how life expectancy has doubled in the developing countries since World War II, and also how infant mortality rates and the instance of child labour have decreased, as well.

    (The teacher wrote that there is a problem of register with "as well".)
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    I think the combination of "also" and "as well" in that sentence is redundant, but I don't think of "as well" as being particularly informal. May I ask what your teacher's ethnicity is? This might be a BE/AE difference.

    I'd also say that demonstrates should be demonstrate, because its subject is statistics, not number.

    Elisabetta
     

    Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In particular, I wrote this sentence:
    They supported their ideas with an impressive number of statistics that demonstrate how life expectancy has doubled in the developing countries since World War II and how infant mortality rates and the instance of child labour have decreased.

    (The teacher wrote that there is a problem of register with "as well".)
    Hi there
    Yes, I agree with your teacher (and Elisabetta) as it is redundant here. Furthermore, I know that you might see "and also" together but it is incorrect. In your sentence, however, you don’t need as well or also as the “and” is quite sufficient.
    In my opinion I would say that “as well” is informal and is used more in speech. I prefer not to see it at the end of a sentence. (…"decreased as well." sounds awful to me.) If you did need it in your sentence (tacked on to the end) then this is better: …..and the instance of child labour have also decreased.
    andalso.html

    Hope this helps
    Ciao
    Leo :)
     

    Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Shouldn't it be instances? And can the be omitted? (instances of child labour)
    mmmm as a matter of fact I looked at this myself and I decided that both were ok (wrongly or rightly;)): the instance of child labour and instances of child labour. (I bet the second will get more "hits" but the first is not a hanging offence) I have a wicked sense of humour sometimes.

    Leo:)
     

    Sandrokkio

    Senior Member
    Italian
    This thread is soooo useful! But I have another question for you:
    Can I say something like:

    I love you as well.

    or:

    I like it as well.
    Me as well.

    Or would it be better to use "too" in this occurrences?

    Thanks a lot!
     
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