as well as a lit match and a stick of dynamite

oskhen

Senior Member
Norwegian
Greetings,

This is from an American novel I'm translating ("Snowbound with the boss", by Maureen Child):

"For some reason, Mike and Jenny Marshall ... got along as well as a lit match and a stick of dynamite. But Sean had the distinct impression something was going on between them."

I actually found it hard to tell whether they're on friendly terms or the opposite. The idiom seems equivocal, and I couldn't find it via google.

Any help would be appreciated

Thanks
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, it is ambiguously puzzling - I would take it that it meant that whilst they were together, it was not long before they exploded into arguing. It only seemed as if they did not get along, but Sean has his doubts and thinks that, in fact, they enjoy one another's company.
     

    oskhen

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I would take it that it meant that whilst they were together, it was not long before they exploded into arguing. It only seemed as if they did not get along, but Sean has his doubts and thinks that, in fact, they enjoy one another's company.
    Thanks for the reply! I thought something similar. I take it that this is not a standard idiom, then?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Not familiar to me, though from the surrounding text we can assume they are exlosive and appear not to get on, but the other guy suspects that they do, really.
     
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