as well as he ever has

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

What does "as well as he ever has" mean in the following text?

Georges "Rush" St-Pierre will feel in the fight and I'd like to see him overcome some of those issues in a more reasonable situation. # No amount of sparring matches the same level of trust and comfort of being in a full fight. In sparring, if you feel concerned about a position or something doesn't feel right, you can stop at any point, it's also a lot easier to avoid situations you don't want to be in during sparring than it is in the fight. # Maybe Georges is 100% and will fight as well as he ever has, he's a -350 favorite for a reason. (Should GSP have had a tune-up fight before Condit?)

Let's change "ever" to "at any time": He will fight as well as he has at any time. Then, what does this new sentence mean? Does it mean this:
1. So far, he has fought well at any time, which means 2.
2. So far, he has always fought well.
Let's add the other clause, and then we get 3:
3. He will fight as well as he has always fought well.

Am I correct? But I feel something is not right. It is true that he has fought well at any time? Any fighter or boxer can lose a match sometimes.
What do you think?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    “as well as he ever has” is a set phrase meaning his performance this time will be equal to his previous performances.
    In itself it doesn’t say how good that performance is.
    In this case his previous performances have been good but you could say it about any level of performance in a different context.

    This is about matching up to a previous personal best. Even if you were rubbish at something you could still “do as well as you ever had”.
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Let's suppose he has had 50 fights. He will fight as well as he ever has. Does it imply he fought well during the 50 times, or does it mean he fought well on some occasions, say, the 2nd, the 10th, the 21st, and he will fight as well as he did on these occasions?

    The word "ever" makes the sentence hard to understand. Without it, it's easy.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Let's suppose he has had 50 fights. He will fight as well as he ever has. Does it imply he fought well during the 50 times, or does it mean he fought well on some occasions, say, the 2nd, the 10th, the 21st, and he will fight as well as he did on these occasions?

    The word "ever" makes the sentence hard to understand. Without it, it's easy.
    We cannot tell that from this comment.
    This comment shows the author's expectation that he will perform in a way that matches his best, whether that was consistent over 50 fights or just a few.
     
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